2023 Kansas City National Conference

October 25-28, 2023

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FILTERS APPLIED:6 - 8, Presentation, Tech Tools, Physical Science

 

Rooms and times subject to change.
4 results
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Zipping to STEM

Friday, October 27 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2204


STRAND: Tech Tools

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We outline an integrated STEM program implemented across multiple schools in a large urban district. The program presented an engineering design challenge using computer-aided design, computational modeling, and 3D printing, as a way to fully integrate the “T” in STEM. We engaged students in solving a real-world problem: optimizing a prototype of a Soap Box Derby Car by using CAD software, virtual and physical wind tunnel testing, and 3D printing. Students investigated the factors that impact the performance of a gravity racing car in order to optimize its performance, using concepts they learned about aerodynamic forces. The students then used CAD Software and virtual simulation testing to design and test a car shell. We will share integration strategies, highlights of the curriculum implementation in several middle school classrooms, and research results from student assessment and teacher interviews to discuss the impact of the curriculum on students’ learning and engagement.

TAKEAWAYS:
How to effectively integrate technology, engineering, and science in a STEM curriculum that focuses on engineering-specific technology tools and computational modeling, and uses science and engineering practices.

SPEAKERS:
Johnna O'Neal (Instructional Specialist: No City, No State), Katrina Halasa (Akron Public Schools: Akron, OH)

CONSTRUCTing Effective Assessment Questions Using the NGSS DCIs

Friday, October 27 • 9:20 AM - 10:20 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2205



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
NSTA-KC 2023, CONSTRUCT presentation, NSTA upload.pptx

STRAND: Research to Practice

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Using the Disciplinary Core Ideas and a research-based “citizen science” approach, science educators contributed their own test items, and also helped to revise existing test items in order to address crucial issues such as difficulty, gender, and racial/ethnic bias that were present in the item analysis characteristics. We share the analysis and results of these efforts so that educators can assess their own test items to be more inclusive of all students understandings in one of the dimensions of the 3-D approach to learning. Learn what changes contributed to improvement of the item as well as what types of changes or revisions made the item worse than before. We also share results of field testing of these items in student classrooms and discuss the importance of incorporating students’ misconceptions into the response choices to capture their true understanding of science concepts as outlined in the DCIs.

TAKEAWAYS:
Learn to evaluate assessment questions that you use to assess students’ sensemaking of elements outlined in the NGSS DCIs. Are the questions free of bias, not too difficult, indicative of overall student performance? Do they include common misconceptions that students hold? Access a free resource.

SPEAKERS:
Cynthia Crockett (Center for Astrophysics | Harvard & Smithsonian: Cambridge, MA)

NMLSTA-Don’t Cross the Streams; Assessment Literacy in the Inquiry-Based Classroom

Friday, October 27 • 1:20 PM - 2:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2215 B


STRAND: Research to Practice

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Based on the work of Andrew Ho and Margaret Heritage, this session will outline the four major “quadrants” of the assessment matrix and review the nature and the stakeholders for each. We focus then on the process of moving from a structured Formative Assessment Process to an Invisible Formative Assessment Process, and benchmarks for delivering high-quality assessment alongside high-quality instruction.

Lastly, we will focus on the NGSS specific requirements for classroom-based assessment and align it to the Herron scale of inquiry to ensure that our assessment process is inclined in the same direction as our instruction.

TAKEAWAYS:
Implementation of inquiry-based standards and the shift to a more inquiry-based classroom requires a clear vision of the assessment opportunities and processes classroom teachers will need to engage in and administrators will need to support and review.

SPEAKERS:
John White (Breakthrough Technologies: , IL)

“How to Cook a Turkey”: Students’ Misconceptions in Science, What We Assume vs. What They Think

Friday, October 27 • 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2215 B



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
NSTA-KC, Oct. 2023, How to Cook a Turkey”, Students' MIsconceptions..... upload.pptx

STRAND: Research to Practice

Show Details

Our students make sense of science and construct their ideas from many experiences, then use that “knowledge” as a foundation for their learning. However, it may not always be a solid foundation. We can help students develop their science knowledge through a deeper understanding of the misconceptions they hold, using phenomena, observation, sensemaking, and robust assessment. We can then assess students’ ideas and misconceptions in the sciences at various grade levels creating and using research-based assessments, understanding the importance of including their ideas in those assessments. When each item contains a choice between a scientifically correct answer and a common, widely-held, student misconception, we can more accurately evaluate our students’ true understanding of the DCI components of the NGSS.

TAKEAWAYS:
Educators will learn how to work with misconceptions that students hold in order to incorporate those into useful assessments. Use students’ sensemaking to discover ways to get at those ideas, and share your students’ misconceptions, hear others as well, and build research-based assessments.

SPEAKERS:
Cynthia Crockett (Center for Astrophysics | Harvard & Smithsonian: Cambridge, MA)

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