2023 Kansas City National Conference

October 25-28, 2023

All sessions added to My Agenda prior to this notice have been exported to the mobile app and will be visible in your account when the app launches. Any sessions added now, will also have to be added in the app.
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FILTERS APPLIED:9 - 12, Hands-On Workshop, Tech Tools, STEM

 

Rooms and times subject to change.
50 results
Save up to 50 sessions in your agenda.

Developing Storylines from a Compelling Anchor

Thursday, October 26 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 D



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Link to the Session Slides

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

N/A

TAKEAWAYS:
Presenting a compelling phenomenon or design challenge requires framing a question and choosing material carefully. Building a storyline requires testing out a launch of a unit to anticipate student questions about it, and first identifying what students will figure out in each lesson of a unit before it occurs.

SPEAKERS:
Bill Penuel (: Boulder, CO)

Decoding Starlight—From Photons to Pixels to Images—Using Science and Art

Thursday, October 26 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Lester Young A



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Decoding Starlight - paper and pencil version
Decoding Starlight - student version
Decoding Starlight Presentation
Js9 Astronomy Image Analysis Software
Making 3 Color Composites with js9 - student handout

STRAND: STEM Haven

Show Details

To analyze data from space and ground-based telescopes, scientists rely on computers, not only to do calculations, but also to change numbers into images. Scientists and programmers go through painstaking calibration and validation processes to ensure that computers produce technically correct images. Visual representation of X-ray data, and radio, infrared, ultraviolet, visible, and gamma, involves the use of representative color techniques where colors in the image represent intensity, energy, temperature, or another property of the radiation. This activity creates models from numerical data. Each model will be unique, depending upon how the photon intensity and energy data was processed – binned and assigned color values – and then analyzed. Artistic representations of this data will be made "by hand" and also by using web-based js9 imaging and analysis software. This is one step in allowing students to do their own astronomy research using real data sets.

TAKEAWAYS:
Scientists learn about astronomical objects from the light they produce. Colors in images are based on data from this light and are used to highlight different features.

SPEAKERS:
Pamela Perry (Lewiston High School: Lewiston, ME)

STEM Outreach for Families: Plan an Engaging and Meaningful Event

Thursday, October 26 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2208


STRAND: STEM Haven

Show Details

This will give information that will enable participants to replicate a STEM outreach event with various theme ideas. The activities are all low-cost and adaptable across student ages and generations of family members. The activities are meant to provide opportunities for students and families to experience success in a fun and enriching way while engaging with STEM concepts from the NRC K-12 Framework. We will also discuss how we used this event as a way for our preservice teachers to experience and practice implementing informal education strategies. This event was hosted at our local STEM Center, but we will also discuss ways that it can be implemented at school STEM nights, at community events, or even as neighborhood "pop-up" events to reach diverse learners in equitable ways.

TAKEAWAYS:
STEM Outreach events can be a way to engage students and families in equitable STEM learning to encourage and support all learners. This will provide information on how to replicate a STEM outreach event we hosted at our local STEM Center along with ideas about implementing it in different formats.

SPEAKERS:
Kelly Moore (Tennessee Tech: Cookeville, TN)

Analyzing X-Ray Pulses from Stellar Cores Using Physics and Web-Based NASA Data, and STEM Image Analysis Tools

Thursday, October 26 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Lester Young A



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Analysis of Two Pulsating X-ray sources js9 (revised).pdf
Analysis of X-Ray Sources with Js9 presentation
Js9 Astronomy Image Analysis Software
X-Ray Spectroscopy of SNRs js9 presentation

STRAND: STEM Haven

Show Details

Participants will use light curve graphs and image analysis software tools located on the web to investigate stellar objects at the centers of supernova remnants, and determine if the objects are white dwarfs or neutron stars. Two sets of data from the Chandra X-Ray public archive will be used to plot brightness versus time to determine the rate of rotation of the object. Centripetal acceleration and Newton's Universal Law of gravitation calculations will then be applied. This activity is designed for physics and/or astronomy classes and integrates STEM analysis tools with the crosscutting concepts, physical science core disciplinary content and engineering concepts embodied by NGSS. Students may also use tools learned in this activity to use js9 to do further research projects using publicly available astronomy data sets.

TAKEAWAYS:
Light curves generated from web-based js9 image analysis software can be used to determine the period of rotation and identify objects as white dwarfs or pulsars using Newton’s Universal Law of gravitation and centripetal acceleration calculations.

SPEAKERS:
Pamela Perry (Lewiston High School: Lewiston, ME)

Selecting Anchoring Phenomena for Equitable 3D Teaching (Part 1 of 2)

Thursday, October 26 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 D



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Session 3 Materials: Selecting Anchoring Phenomena for Equitable 3D Teaching

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

N/A

TAKEAWAYS:
Phenomena is foundational to science and intellectual pursuits in general! Come make sense of the idea and think about how phenomena-based instruction can engage your students in meaningful learning.

SPEAKERS:
Bill Penuel (: Boulder, CO), Tiffany Neill (Research Scientist: Oklahoma City, OK)

Talk like your cell phone does (an inquiry lab)

Thursday, October 26 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Jay McShann B


STRAND: STEM Haven

Show Details

Working in teams, students take a short analog message and convert it to binary code for cell phone transmission. Students then send those zero’s and one over a carrier wave using a form of amplitude modulation to another team. At the other end the message is decoded and rewritten in analog form. which message was first? How close was it? A discussion of challenges the students’ faced in acting like a DSP (digital signal processor) lets student see some of the challenges of the original binary code and how subsequent forms of coding came about to address some of those challenges. Students discover the binary code they used was Morse code. Students then code and send a different message using the original 5-digit computer code. After racing to send their messages, students are guided through a follow-up discussion on the pros and cons of the new (Baudot) computer code used.

TAKEAWAYS:
Students will understand some of the challenges faced in digital signal processing as sending digital information evolved by completing a lab activity where they will code and decode messages into a digital format for transmission and receiving, similar to how cell phones work.

SPEAKERS:
John Clark (Volusia Online Learning: Port Orange, FL)

STEM Behind Breast Cancer and Type I Diabetes

Thursday, October 26 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Jay McShann A


STRAND: Research to Practice

Show Details

Finding causes, treatments, and cures for diseases is “STEM on the front-lines.” Without all four components of the STEM model firmly set in place, any serious medical research is destined to fail. Sanford Research in Sioux Falls, SD has formed an “all-star research team” that is committed to finding a cure for Type 1 Diabetes (T1D) and Breast Cancer. In this session, we will highlight the progress that is being made in solving the T1D and Breast Cancer puzzles. Using interactive virtual activities, participants will develop an understanding of the difference between a body that is functioning normally and one that has developed T1D or Breast Cancer. We will wrap up the session with a discussion of the paths that Sanford Research is taking in their quest to help cure the disease. All discussion of human anatomy and physiology will be at a gentle introductory level.

TAKEAWAYS:
Using real case studies, attendees will follow the journeys of a breast cancer survivor and a teenage Type I Diabetic, from diagnosis through treatment.

SPEAKERS:
Jeffrey Lukens (Retired Science Teacher: Sioux Falls, SD)

Build a STEM Slide Whistle

Thursday, October 26 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Mary Lou Williams


STRAND: STEM Haven

Show Details

Participants will build their own digital slid whistle. They will experiment with a motion sensor and use that data to convert to sound frequency by creating a regression equation. This activity is a simple one to two day activity that can be completed in the classroom as an enrichment or as a stand alone activity that can be developed over several class sessions.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will leave with a simple STEM project that will engage students and can lead to incredible enrichment discussions!

SPEAKERS:
Brad Posnanski (Comsewogue High School: Port Jefferson Station, NY)

Physics Lessons in the Science Practices Innovation Notebook (SPIN)

Thursday, October 26 • 3:40 PM - 4:40 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Bennie Moten


STRAND: Tech Tools

Show Details

SPIN, a FREE web-based notebook created with funding by NSF, has 4 customizable lessons for data-focused investigations in Physics on Centripetal Force, Ohm’s Law, Pendulums, and Impact. Teachers can also input their own lessons into SPIN. One of the teachers who created the lessons in the notebook will be presenting. During the first 30 minutes, presenters will give teachers accounts in SPIN and show how students can use the notebook and the metacognitive support features such as the Communication Hub, I’m Stuck button, and SPAARC prompts. Experiences of teachers and students who have used SPIN will be discussed. In the final 30 minutes, teachers will customize a lesson in SPIN or input their own lessons with help from the presenters. By the end of the session, teachers will be able to use SPIN effectively with the ability to share the notebook with all of the teachers at their school. Use of SPIN is entirely free and is found at https://spin.cehd.gmu.edu/login.

TAKEAWAYS:
Teachers will learn how to use SPIN to download and edit a lesson from the Global Marketplace or create their own lesson in SPIN. Teachers who have used SPIN note that it has helped their students understand data practices explicitly.

SPEAKERS:
Erin Barrett (Physics Teacher: Purcellville, VA), Erin Peters-Burton (George Mason University: Fairfax, VA)

Check Your Bias at the Door: How to Apply Anti-Bias Work Into the STEM Classroom

Thursday, October 26 • 3:40 PM - 4:40 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2215 A


STRAND: Leadership and Advocacy

Show Details

Content will be delivered through Google Slides: participants discuss what bias is and the different types of biases that can show up. Participants will be asked to share biases they may hold (inside or outside of the classroom). We will watch a short video clip, then participants will engage in an activity called "How diverse is your universe?" Several prompts will be read and participants will indicate which racial group the prompt identifies with. An example prompt: "the people I grew up with in my household were...," and participants will indicate which racial group the prompt identifies with. Next, as a group, we will come up with our own definition of bias, and come up with examples of the different types of biases and what they look like in the classroom. We will then look at strategies on how to keep these biases in check. Next, we will discuss how to apply anti-bias work in STEM classrooms. We will develop and share content-specific lessons that we can implement.

TAKEAWAYS:
Anti-bias work in the classroom can be implemented in all curricular areas, especially in STEM/STEAM.

SPEAKERS:
Anissa Williams (Niper Middle School: Kirkwood, MO)

Physics Through Flight

Thursday, October 26 • 3:40 PM - 4:40 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Lester Young B



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
National Free Flight Society Homepage
Presentation Slides
Science Olympiad Homepage
Science Olympiad Program Information

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Ever since the Wright Brothers first took flight in Kitty Hawk, the idea of powered flight has fascinated and captivated people. Unfortunately, despite flight's engaging nature and connections to fundamental physics concepts it is not a common topic in classrooms. Throughout our combined 97 years of existence our organizations, the National Free Flight Society and Science Olympiad, have been working to change this reality. In this session, we will introduce attendees to the idea of free flight model aircraft, demonstrate how these aircraft can be flown safely in schools, and share the variety of instructional resources that are immediately available for classroom use. Following this, we will identify ways attendees can take what they have learned and the activities available to enhance their classroom instruction. The session will close with a demonstration flight of a free flight model aircraft built from start to finish during this 60-minute session.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will learn the art of the possible when it comes to using flight as a topic to engage students in their study of forces, free body diagrams, and Newton's Laws.

SPEAKERS:
David Lindley (President: Lisle, IL), Julie Newman (Engineer), John Loehr (Science Olympiad: Oakbrook Terrace, IL)

Selecting Anchoring Phenomena for Equitable 3D Teaching (Part 2 of 2)

Thursday, October 26 • 3:40 PM - 4:40 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 D



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Session 4 Materials: Selecting Anchoring Phenomena for Equitable 3D Teaching

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

N/A

TAKEAWAYS:
Phenomena is foundational to science and intellectual pursuits in general! This session helps you understand powerful qualities of phenomena and how they can support meaningful student investigations in and out of the classroom.

SPEAKERS:
Bill Penuel (: Boulder, CO), Tiffany Neill (Research Scientist: Oklahoma City, OK)

VSEPR in the 21st Century: Using Coding, SIMS, and Rovers

Thursday, October 26 • 3:40 PM - 4:40 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Big Joe Turner B



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
VSEPR NSTA KC.pptx

STRAND: Tech Tools

Show Details

Using the standard model kits for inspiration, attendees will see how using simulations for 3-D modeling of molecular geometry can help students "see" the unseen. Taking this knowledge, attendees will code a rover to draw the molecular shapes using simple and easy coding commands. NO EXPERIENCE REQUIRED! Student's will be exposed to not only molecular geometry, but will also tie in mathematical geometry with the use of interior and exterior angles for their shapes.

TAKEAWAYS:
Give students new ways to visualize molecular geometry while integrating coding into the science classroom and maybe learning a little geometry!

SPEAKERS:
Stacy Thibodeaux (Southside High School: Youngsville, LA), Chris Coker (Camden Fairview High School: Camden, AR)

Organizing Classroom Talk to Hear All Students’ Ideas: Equity-focused 3D Formative Assessment Through Talk

Friday, October 27 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 D



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Session 5: Organizing Classroom Talk to Hear All Students’ Ideas: Equity-focused

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

N/A

TAKEAWAYS:
The goal of this session is to support teachers in understanding how best to meet the needs of all learners by starting from where students are at and drawing on their intuitive ideas and real world experiences to inform instruction. All strategies are framed as equitable 3-D formative assessment.

SPEAKERS:
Kelsie Fowler (University of Washington: Seattle, WA), Deb Morrison (Educator and Learning Scientist: Seattle, WA)

Case Studies: What Are They and How To Use Them in Your Classroom

Friday, October 27 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2104 B



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
What is a Case - Resources Website
This website will give you access to many of the resources and links mentioned in this workshop. Note that it is hosted on a Google site.

STRAND: Research to Practice

Show Details

Case Studies are stories with an educational message. Learn how case studies engage learners, develop critical thinking, and enhance collaborative and communication skills. You will experience a case and try to solve a real-world mystery of a woman who was told she was not her children’s mother.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will experience a case study as learners, reflect on the experience and on the pedagogical potential, and discuss ways to use the technique effectively. They will explore NSTA’s collection of almost 1000 freely accessible case studies in all STEM disciplines.

SPEAKERS:
Annie Prud'homme-Généreux (University of British Columbia: No City, No State)

All in the Family: The Story of Human Evolution

Friday, October 27 • 1:20 PM - 2:20 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Jay McShann A


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Although there is no shortage of potential phenomena for teaching about the process of evolution, using human evolution is a sure way to make the topic relevant and engaging for all students. It is also an excellent way to address some of the most common student misconceptions surrounding the subject, such as “humans evolved from monkeys,” “if humans evolved from apes, why are there still apes?” and “humans are the pinnacle of the tree of life and therefore no longer evolving like other organisms.” By examining a wide range of evidence, including different potential variations of hominid skulls (physical replicas, cards, or 3D digital models), geographic data, artifacts, and climate trends, students will be able to piece together a model of hominid phylogeny and learn about the changes in anatomy, behavior, and distribution that led to our unique human features. Resources: https://ncse.ngo/supporting-teachers/classroom-resources

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will explore a range of paleoanthropology evidence to confidently guide students through one of the most engaging evolutionary phenomena – human evolution. Learn about extinct hominid groups and how they are connected to human origins through features, behaviors, and relationships.

SPEAKERS:
Blake Touchet (National Center for Science Education: Oakland, CA), Lin Andrews (National Center for Science Education: Oakland, CA)

"H-Two-Poo": Contextualizing High School Science Through Wastewater Testing and Public Health

Friday, October 27 • 1:20 PM - 2:20 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Basie Ballroom B


STRAND: STEM Haven

Show Details

In this session, participants will experience part of an NGSS-aligned unit on wastewater testing and COVID-19. This six-lesson unit utilizing the 5E learning approach was developed through the collaboration of educators, engineers, scientists, medical doctors, and public health experts within an NIH-funded project. Attendees will participate in the fourth lesson of the sequence, entitled “H-Two-Poo.” Participants will first test the quality of different water samples to answer the driving question “how do you know if water is safe to use?” Participants will then learn about sources of wastewater, methods of wastewater management, and the development of a wastewater testing protocol to detect the presence of COVID-19. The experiences of high school students and teachers who have participated in the implementation of this phenomenon-based unit will be shared, including data from student surveys and handouts, along with photos of field trips to the community wastewater treatment facility.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will utilize science and engineering practices to collect and analyze water quality data. They will further learn how science and engineering have been used to develop wastewater testing techniques that inform public health decisions in our communities.

SPEAKERS:
Sahar Alameh (University of Kentucky: Lexington, KY), Jeff Chalfant (Ph.D. Candidate), Sagan Goodpaster (University of Kentucky: Lexington, KY)

Exploring Marine Hydrokinetics

Friday, October 27 • 1:20 PM - 2:20 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Julie Lee


STRAND: STEM Haven

Show Details

NEED’s Exploring Marine Hydrokinetics (MHK) is an exploratory unit for secondary students that includes teacher and student guides containing comprehensive background information on energy, the properties of fluids and waves, electricity, hydrokinetic technologies, and careers in the emerging industry of MHK. Participants will have the opportunity to apply the science of the oceans and electricity generation as they learn about the many types of MHK technology, explore case studies, consider siting a project, and build their own sample wave generator model. The curriculum is available for free and includes hands-on, inquiry-based explorations, group presentations, and cooperative learning activities.

TAKEAWAYS:
The energy of moving water can be harnessed and converted into electricity in many ways, including technologies for harnessing the energy in ocean tides, waves, and currents. Participants will learn activities for students that explore these concepts and best practices for implementing.

SPEAKERS:
Don Pruett, Jr. (Washington Science Teachers Association: Everett, WA)

Incorporating Earth and Space Science NGSS Core Ideas into Chemistry

Friday, October 27 • 1:20 PM - 2:20 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Lester Young A


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Most students in Missouri only take physical and life sciences to graduate leaving the Earth & Space Science strands of NGSS untouched. Most educators, additionally, do not have a strong enough earth & space science background to integrate these strands into their science classes. However, most of these Earth and Science strands can easily be adapted into a high school chemistry class (and biology, although my background is in chemistry) without having to give up core content. In this presentation, educators will be do a wet lab (Cleaning Up an Ocean Oil Spill) and receive access to additional labs (precipitation lab, acid rain lab, and viscosity of volcanoes) that meet the basic general chemistry class standards (PS NGSS strands) and incorporate earth and space sciences. Attendees will also learn of additional resources such as Gizmos and NASA that can be incorporated and hit the ESS science standards. Lastly, attendees will learn of books and resources for them to learn more.

TAKEAWAYS:
Learn how to integrate the Earth & Space standards into a basic chemistry high school class. Resources can be adapted for biology and middle school levels.

SPEAKERS:
Stephanie Coyle (Jefferson Middle School: Columbia, MO)

The Chemistry and Statistics of the U.S. Penny

Friday, October 27 • 1:20 PM - 2:20 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Big Joe Turner B


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

How can we assess the quality of sampling and variability of the data to help us in decision-making? The various metals and alloys used in the minting of the penny over the years will provide for rich explorations, which are part of the chemistry curriculum. We will highlight the important cross-disciplinary aspect, linking the science content (mass/chemical composition) to the mathematical models outlined in the NGSS section on Systems and Models to show how to use it to simulate systems and interactions. Through hands-on activities and the use of technology, participants will explore a variety of data sets and use this knowledge to better understand and use statistics to make accurate and fair arguments related to everyday topics. We will explore how the sample mean varies from sample to sample. While this is considered one of the more challenging topics for quality control, we will illustrate the concepts though some basic sampling of the typical age and mass of the U.S. penny.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will use real data to develop mathematical models and learn how to test our hypothesis by performing an experiment and analyzing the results, combining chemical analysis with statistical sampling for a cross-curricular approach.

SPEAKERS:
Karlheinz Haas (Science/Math Instructor, Retired: Tequesta, FL)

Case Studies: Different Types For Different Needs

Friday, October 27 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2104 B



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Types of Cases - Resources Website URL
This slide contains links to the Resources Website that accompanies this session. There, you will find many of the documents and links mentioned in the session. Note that this webpage is hosted on a Google site.

STRAND: Research to Practice

Show Details

Case studies are stories with an educational message that capture & hold students’ attention. Cases come in all shapes/sizes for small/large classes. They include intimate debate, clicker, discussion, Problem-Based Learning, and jigsaw. Learn how to pick the most appropriate one for your class.

TAKEAWAYS:
Educators will leave the workshop with a better understanding of several case study formats and will be able to choose the best one for their purpose. They will also discuss strategies for facilitating each one most effectively. The NSTA case collection has almost 1,000 selections.

SPEAKERS:
Annie Prud'homme-Généreux (University of British Columbia: No City, No State)

Earth Science Lessons in the Science Practices Innovation Notebook (SPIN)

Friday, October 27 • 2:40 PM - 3:40 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Lester Young A



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
NSTA_SPIN2023.pptx

STRAND: Tech Tools

Show Details

SPIN, a FREE web-based notebook created with funding by NSF, has three customizable lessons for data-focused investigations in Earth Science on Sunspots, Tides, and Hurricanes. Teachers can also input their own lessons into SPIN. One of the teachers who created the lessons in the notebook will be presenting. The first 30 minutes presenters will give teachers accounts in SPIN and show how students can use the notebook and the metacognitive support features such as the Communication Hub, I’m Stuck button, and SPAARC prompts. Experiences of teachers and students who have used SPIN will be discussed. In the final 30 minutes, teachers will customize a lesson in SPIN or input their own lessons with help from the presenters. By the end of the session, teachers will be able to use SPIN effectively with the ability to share the notebook with all of the teachers at their school. Use of SPIN is free and is found at https://spin.cehd.gmu.edu/login. Biology, chemistry, and physics also available.

TAKEAWAYS:
Teachers will learn how to use SPIN to download and edit a lesson from the Global Marketplace or create their own lesson in SPIN. Teachers who have used SPIN note that it has helped their students understand data practices explicitly.

SPEAKERS:
Kevin Cabaniss (Teacher, Science), Erin Peters-Burton (George Mason University: Fairfax, VA)

Do Your Students Really Understand Chemical Equilibrium?

Friday, October 27 • 2:40 PM - 3:40 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Basie Ballroom C


STRAND: STEM Haven

Show Details

Chemical equilibrium is a central topic to the understanding of both Chemistry and Biology, yet students have many misconceptions. The NGSS standard HS PS1-6 covers this important topic. In a recent AP Chemistry Exam, the vast majority of students did poorly on the topic and had misconceptions about equilibrium; 73 % of the students received a zero or had no response to the equilibrium question. Students are most familiar with equilibrium problems and experiments where the K value is small; usually less than one. Exam questions dealing with a large K value cause the majority of students to do poorly. In this presentation, participants will take part in a “hands-on” inquiry activity with an equilibrium having a large K value. Participants will learn methods to overcome student misconceptions of equilibrium. Join this workshop to take an inquiry lab back to use in your classroom. Handouts will be provided. There will be time allotted for participant questions.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will learn to use Inquiry to overcome student misconceptions about chemical equilibrium.

SPEAKERS:
Gregory Dodd (Retired Chemistry Teacher: Pennsboro, WV)

Dumpster Dive with STEM

Friday, October 27 • 2:40 PM - 3:40 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Andy Kirk


STRAND: STEM Haven

Show Details

Connect the human impact of trash pollution to engineering design. Get your students thinking critically and creatively as they collaborate in real-world problem-solving. The global real-world issue of human-generated trash polluting local bodies of water is the main focus of this hands-on session. Using our partnership with the Howard County Conservancy, our students learn about their local watersheds and contribute to a Watershed Report Card. Students see how trash that is often found on our local schoolyards can affect our watershed, and they design a working model for trash removal in a local tributary. Basic coding will be used to design programs that will control sensors and motors through a microcontroller, thus removing the trash from the water source. The model will utilize solar and water power to move the trash into a separate receptacle. Various sensors will also be used to monitor water levels and determine the outcome of the program.

TAKEAWAYS:
1. Connecting the human impact of single-use plastics and their effect on aquatic ecosystems; 2. Exposing students to basic coding and engineering design in an NGSS-focused content classroom; and 3. Developing a project that enhances STEM skills in students such as collaboration, curiosity, and creativity.

SPEAKERS:
Jessica Kohout (Educational Consultant: Voorhees, NJ)

Making the most of the first week of school: transforming expectations to establish new norms

Friday, October 27 • 2:40 PM - 3:40 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 D



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Session 8 Materials: Making the most of the first week of school: transforming e

Show Details

N/A

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will learn tools to create a culture-setting first unit that energizes students’ engagement in deep learning through a focus on equity. Student-created identity maps, discussion circles focused on science and justice, and using student science outside of the classroom are three such tools.

SPEAKERS:
April Luehmann (University of Rochester: Rochester, NY), James Kostka (New Visions Charter High Schools for Advanced Math & Science II: No City, No State), Hannah Cooke (Research Assistant: , CT), Katrina Robinson (Chemistry Teacher), Ellen Ellison (Science Teacher: Naples, NY)

Integrating Art in a High School Chemistry Class

Friday, October 27 • 2:40 PM - 3:40 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Colonial Ballroom



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Integrating Art in High School Chemistry

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Presenters will share student work which showcases art and creativity in the chemistry classroom. Stop-motion videos can be used to show what is happening at the particulate level for different types of chemical reactions, bond enthalpy calculations, and electron excitation in light emission. TV theme song parodies can be used as a way to assess student understanding of a variety of chemistry topics. Sketchnotes can be incorporated to demonstrate knowledge of a particular lab, chemistry unit or short article which pertains to the topic being covered in class. Students also write children's books to showcase their understanding of climate change and ocean acidification. Finally, lab based art projects are a fun way to begin or end a unit of study and the student work can then be displayed in the classroom.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will leave with a variety of ideas about how to incorporate sketchnotes, stop-motion videos, songs, painting, and storytelling into their chemistry classrooms.

SPEAKERS:
Nathan Gustin (Adlai E. Stevenson High School: Lincolnshire, IL), Ashley Rose (Adlai E. Stevenson High School: Lincolnshire, IL)

Star Formation in the Cartwheel Galaxy with Web-Based NASA Data and STEM Image Analysis Tools

Friday, October 27 • 2:40 PM - 3:40 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Jay McShann B



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Cartwheel Galaxy js9 (revised).pdf
Cartwheel Galaxy js9 Presentation
Js9 Astronomy Image Analysis Software

STRAND: STEM Haven

Show Details

Participants will use web-based image and data analysis software and real data sets to compare the Cartwheel Galaxy in optical and X-ray bands to determine the sources of the ultra and hyperluminous X-rays in the galaxy. This investigation can be done on smart phones, laptops, and tablets with an internet connection. The unusual shape of the Cartwheel Galaxy is most probably the result of a collision with one of the smaller nearby galaxies several hundred years ago. The collision produced compression waves within the galaxy which triggered bursts of massive star formation. Participants will use the location of the U/HLXs on the x-ray image and optical image, as well as information about expansion rates and the life cycles of stars to determine what these objects might be. This is a great introduction to the software that astrophysicists use. Participants will also learn about the possibilities for other kinds of investigations and research with the software and the thousands of available data sets.

TAKEAWAYS:
Astrophysicists use light in all bands of the electromagnetic spectrum to determine the nature of an object. Web-based software will be used; the same tools used by scientists. This software can be used by students to do their own investigations in astronomy with real data sets.

SPEAKERS:
Pamela Perry (Lewiston High School: Lewiston, ME)

Promoting Equity by Systematically Noticing and Responding to Learning Experiences through Practical Measures

Friday, October 27 • 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 D



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Promoting Equity by Systematically Noticing and Responding to Learning Experienc

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N/A

TAKEAWAYS:
Students experience learning in widely variable ways due to different factors. Our guide to practical measures—which includes many examples—shows how quick, goal-driven assessments can meaningfully guide how learning is experienced—in a classroom and even across an educational system. #NSFfunded

SPEAKERS:
Philip Bell (University of Washington: Seattle, WA), Bill Penuel (: Boulder, CO), Deb Morrison (Educator and Learning Scientist: Seattle, WA), Tiffany Neill (Research Scientist: Oklahoma City, OK)

Investigating Stellar Evolution – From Star Formation Regions to Catastrophic Destruction – using NASA Image Sets

Friday, October 27 • 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Jay McShann B



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
https://chandra.si.edu/
https://chandra.si.edu/edu/
https://chandra.si.edu/edu/
https://universe-of-learning.org/home
Presentation Slide Set
SE RESOURCES Kansas City.pdf

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Stars form in giant molecular clouds of gas and dust in massive star formation complexes, and depending on their initial mass, usually follow a sequence that ends in their destruction in catastrophic collapses and explosions. The process of stellar evolution provides the energy which drives the universe, and thereby determines its future. During the last stages of evolution, nucleosynthesis creates the elements which will enrich the next generation of protostars and planets. formation of stars also sets the stage for possible exoplanets forming within the debris disks of young protostars as hydrogen begins to fuse in their cores. This basic sequencing activity is one of a series of activities designed to show how scientists view, study, and examine the process of stellar evolution. The card sets have descriptions and links and can be used as a pretest or a posttest, either individually or as a group. Multiple answers are acceptable. A scoring rubric is included.

TAKEAWAYS:
Stellar evolution is a cosmic cycle from the formation of protostars and stars in cold molecular clouds, through their final collapses into remnants and stellar cores. This process creates heavier elements and sets the stage for the formation of exoplanets and the next generation of star formation.

SPEAKERS:
Donna Young (NASA/NSO/UoL Program Manager: Laughlin, NV)

Engineering Design and Coding in the Chemistry Classroom?

Friday, October 27 • 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Big Joe Turner B



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Engineering Design in the Chemistry Classroom.pdf

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Adding engineering design and coding in the context of a core course like Chemistry may be difficult for teachers. This session will have participants collecting real world data, designing a solution to a real world problem, and adding a coding twist to that solution. Participants will either use a pH sensor or a temperature sensor to collect data, code a microcontroller to have an output of a fan or RGB LEDs, and play a sound. No coding or design experience necessary.

TAKEAWAYS:
Coding and engineering design in the Chemistry classroom based on real world data collection.

SPEAKERS:
Chris Coker (Camden Fairview High School: Camden, AR), Stacy Thibodeaux (Southside High School: Youngsville, LA)

Advocating for Culturally Inclusive Practices in STEAM

Saturday, October 28 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2215 A


STRAND: Research to Practice

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After a brief introduction of session presenters and review of session norms, participants will be engaged in small group review and whole group discussion of a case study that provides evidence of why culture is important in the context of STEAM lessons. Following the case study, participants will be introduced to a Culturally Inclusive Lesson Planning Tool to enhance the participation of diverse learners from traditionally underrepresented students. The tool is grounded in culturally relevant research strategies that ensures that all students feel included in their specific classroom environment. The session will conclude with a debrief and evaluation of the experience.

TAKEAWAYS:
Why are culturally inclusive strategies important in STEAM classrooms? How can you synthesize strategies that challenge and engage a diverse group of learners? In this session, we will reveal a planning tool that you can use to advocate for learner success in STEAM classroom settings.

SPEAKERS:
Deanna Taylor (Interactive Learning Solutions LLC: Columbia, SC)

How to Design Justice-Focused 3D Assessments in Science

Saturday, October 28 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 D



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Session 10 Materials: How to Design Justice-Focused 3D Assessments in Science

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

N/A

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will learn about a detailed 9-step process for conceiving, developing, testing, refining, and using 3-D science assessments focused on social justice phenomena and topics. Open education resources that support this assessment development process will also be shared. #NSFfunded

SPEAKERS:
Philip Bell (University of Washington: Seattle, WA), Bill Penuel (: Boulder, CO)

The Vitamin C Workshop: Quantitative Analysis of Vitamin C in Juice and Vitamins - The Perfect Integration of Chemistry and Mathematics

Saturday, October 28 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2201



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
0-Workshop NSTA VitC Titration Handout GraphPaper.pdf
0-Workshop NSTA VitC Titration Handout Instructions.pdf
1-NSTA Vit C Titration Handout.pdf
2-NSTA Vit C Clock Handout.pdf
3-NSTA Red Cabbage Handout.pdf
4-NSTA Foot to Hand.pdf
5-NSTA Milk Lab Handout.pdf
NSTA Pic.jpg

STRAND: STEM Haven

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Adventures in Laboratory Science is a theme-based physical science course for non-science majors designed to expose students to the basic principles of chemistry and mathematics using common household substances. In addition to "non-science" college students, this workshop is appropriate for teachers of students in the 3rd through 12th grades. Attendees will work in groups of 4 to complete two experiments: the titration of vitamin C with iodine and the iodine clock reaction. The experiments will include the titration of standard vitamin C solutions to produce a linear curve which will be used to calculate the vitamin C content in juice samples. After collecting all data, participants will analyze and interpret the results using Excel and basic algebraic principles. The goal is to have participants do the Vitamin C project with their students and then enter the data into a shared file to create a national collaborative publishable work between the presenter and the attendees.

TAKEAWAYS:
Learn how to integrate math into the vitamin C project and customize the project to meet the academic standards of your students and to join a collaborative research project for students in 3rd through 12th grade.

SPEAKERS:
Sharron Jenkins (Georgia Gwinnett College: Lawrenceville, GA)

Supporting All Students Make Sense of Phenomena By Building All of Their Intellectual Resources

Saturday, October 28 • 10:40 AM - 11:40 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 D


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

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The Framework and NGSS vision calls for creating opportunities for ALL students to meaningfully engage in sensemaking and learning in science. A culturally responsive approach to instruction highlights the range of intellectual resources that students bring to learning situations based on their cultural histories. Intellectual resources such as student language, perspective, gestures, and prior knowledge are classroom assets. Through a series of concrete accounts of learning situations, this session will create opportunities for participants to work with others to ‘learn to see’ students’ sense-making resources—and connect these pedagogical strategies to their own classroom practice. We frame this approach through an equity and justice framework for culturally responsive instruction centered in the NRC Framework for K-12 Science Education, which posits that science learning should be rooted in students’ ways of being and ways of knowing.

TAKEAWAYS:
Culturally responsive education supports student sensemaking and learning in science. Inclusive science strategies help teachers learn to see students’ diverse sensemaking resources. These methods help us create and adapt curriculum that is equitable and centered on justice.

SPEAKERS:
Philip Bell (University of Washington: Seattle, WA)

Engineering Connects Classrooms to STEM Careers

Saturday, October 28 • 1:20 PM - 2:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 C


STRAND: STEM Haven

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Looking for ways to integrate engineering in your science curriculum? Join us to become familiar with freely-available, high-quality instructional materials that create opportunities for students to apply science ideas to solve real-world problems, gain confidence and see themselves in STEM careers.

TAKEAWAYS:
Learn how to engage students in learning that centers on addressing pressing social challenges and be able to describe transdisciplinary approaches to education.

SPEAKERS:
Rob Wallace (NSTA: Kenner, LA)

Exploring Science through 3D Modeling: Enhancing Learning and Engagement in the Classroom

Saturday, October 28 • 1:20 PM - 2:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2503 B


STRAND: Tech Tools

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Often art mimics science and some aspects of science seem divinely beautiful. As an approach for developing a holistic curriculum for the science classroom, the novel approach of using common, free, 3D modeling tools has been considered and implemented in the science classroom. The objective of this session is to introduce educators to the benefits and opportunities of using 3D modeling in the science classroom to enhance student learning and engagement. The session will provide practical tips and strategies for integrating 3D modeling technology (Blender) into science lessons, as well as showcase examples of successful implementation. Blender is a free, easy to use, yet robust, 3d modeling and simulation software.

TAKEAWAYS:
Educators will have practical tips and strategies for integrating 3-D modeling into their science lessons. Participants will have hands-on experience with 3-D modeling tools and software. Educators will be able to share their experiences and ask questions about using 3-D modeling in the classroom.

SPEAKERS:
Ashley Posey (McCallie School: Chattanooga, TN), Jessica Dobrin (Science Teacher: Chattanooga, TN), Caleb Bagby (Director of Educational Technology: Chattanooga, TN)

Connecting Math and Science Through Technology: Data Analysis Made Easy

Saturday, October 28 • 1:20 PM - 2:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2504 B


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

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The workshop will offer ideas to move from the typical teacher-led classroom to one that focuses on problem-solving, data analysis and exploratory learning. Learn how to combine graphing calculators with handheld sensors to maximize class time and provide opportunities for engaging inquiry and discussion. We will illustrate how you can utilize science tasks to support your 3-D initiative and the goals outlined in the NGSS, while at the same time reinforcing and seamlessly integrating CCSS for Mathematics. You can use one sensor at a time or multiple sensors simultaneously for lab-based or in-the-field data collection to quickly collect and analyze data. Several sensors will be available to explore this integrated solution. Hands-on science using this integrated technology gets students excited about science and math and deepens their understanding of seemingly complex concepts. It will free up class time for student engagement in the analysis, synthesis, and evaluation of real data.

TAKEAWAYS:
Use real data to develop mathematical models and learn how to test your hypothesis by performing an experiment and analyzing your results, combining graphing calculators with handheld sensors to maximize class time.

SPEAKERS:
Karlheinz Haas (Science/Math Instructor, Retired: Tequesta, FL)

Adapting Open Education Resources (OER) Instructional Materials to Connect to Local Phenomena and Priorities

Saturday, October 28 • 1:20 PM - 2:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 D



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Session 12 Materials: Adapting Open Education Resources (OER) Instructional Mate

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

N/A

TAKEAWAYS:
Leave with practical strategies and resources to adapt OER materials effectively, making science education more culturally relevant, engaging, and impactful for their students.

SPEAKERS:
Bill Penuel (: Boulder, CO), Lindsey Mohan (BSCS Science Learning: Colorado Springs, CO), Tiffany Neill (Research Scientist: Oklahoma City, OK)

Copper: Two Inquiries to Begin and End the School Year

Saturday, October 28 • 1:20 PM - 2:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 G


STRAND: STEM Haven

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Copper is used in plumbing, coinage, and electrical wiring; yet we often take this element for granted. Copper has been known since at least 9000 BC, but many of its reactions and properties have only been determined in recent centuries. This inquiry requires students to: research the chemical reactions of copper (redox, double displacement, and decomposition), apply prior knowledge of stoichiometry and conservation of matter, analyze a copper solution using spectroscopy, and use proper laboratory techniques and skills. NGSS standards HS PS1-2, HS PS1-5, and HS PS1-7 will be addressed. Participants will: research and design an Inquiry experiment, use technology to collect/analyze data, & visualize what occurs on the submicroscopic level by employing particulate drawings. Join this workshop to take home a two-unit inquiry lab which is a perfect beginning-of-year lab and end-of-course lab practical. There will be time allotted for participant questions. Handouts will be provided.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will take part in a “hands-on” Inquiry experiment, use technology to collect/analyze data, and visualize what occurs on the submicroscopic level in copper chemical reactions by employing particulate drawings.

SPEAKERS:
Gregory Dodd (Retired Chemistry Teacher: Pennsboro, WV)

The Color and Sound of Temperature

Saturday, October 28 • 1:20 PM - 2:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2503 A


STRAND: STEM Haven

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Participants in this workshop will use a temperature sensor/probe to measure the temperature of a liquid. They will then design and code a program that will display the temperature and also incorporate other multi-sensory devices to indicate if the liquid is safe for drinking. This workshop will allow participants to go through the engineering design process and create a working model by the end of the session. No prior coding knowledge is required, just a willingness to create, learn, and have fun doing it.

TAKEAWAYS:
Create a multi-sensory temperature detector. Implement coding in Python into the STEM/Science/Mathematics classroom. Learn how to give students ownership in their projects.

SPEAKERS:
Jessica Kohout (Educational Consultant: Voorhees, NJ), Brad Posnanski (Comsewogue High School: Port Jefferson Station, NY)

Harnessing the Power of ChatGPT in Science Classrooms: A Comprehensive Workshop for Teachers

Saturday, October 28 • 1:20 PM - 2:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2203


Show Details

Part 1: We'll demonstrate how to use the ChatGPT to create dynamic curriculum & lesson plans that encourage student curiosity and foster a love for scientific inquiry. We'll demonstrate how to use the AI to generate thought-provoking questions, design hands-on activities, and provide real-time feedback to enhance student learning. Part 2: Learn how ChatGPT can assist you in designing assessments that effectively measure student understanding and track progress toward learning objectives. We'll cover strategies for generating AI-powered quizzes, tests, and projects, as well as using ChatGPT to analyze student performance and provide personalized feedback. Part 3: Navigate the potential challenges and ethical considerations of using ChatGPT in the classroom. We'll discuss best practices for responsibly and transparently integrating ChatGPT into your teaching, while maintaining student privacy and addressing potential biases in the AI's output.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will learn how to effectively integrate ChatGPT into science education, enhancing lesson plans, curriculum, and assessments while addressing ethical considerations for responsible AI implementation.

SPEAKERS:
Ren Rende (University of Nebraska at Omaha: No City, No State), Noah Glaser (Assistant Professor: COLUMBIA, MO)

Charting the Course with uBEATS (a FREE Interactive STEM Resource)

Saturday, October 28 • 2:40 PM - 3:40 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2503 B



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
uBEATS Module Sample Lesson Plans
uBEATS PowerPoint Presentation

STRAND: Tech Tools

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Content for our presentation includes: Opening-Introduction, History and Background of uBEATS, Highlights of the Program, Standards Alignment to NGSS and NCHSE, and a Canvas course walk-through Activity-In this activity portion, we will be taking a “Deep Dive” into uBEATS. We will preview a selected sample Freshman biology unit (Cellular Biology) and show specific modules that could be integrated into that unit of study (Cellular Structure and Function, Mitosis, and Cancer). The modules used in this preview will provide two different interactive activities that we will complete together while viewing them in the module. These modules will provide a review of core content, provide an extension to the core content, and bring in a career connection (Careers in Medical Imaging and Therapeutic Sciences). Closing-Register, Module Preview, social media, Podcast

TAKEAWAYS:
In this session, attendees will walk away with a clear understanding of what uBEATS is, how to effectively use this resource, and be fully prepared for implementation in their classrooms.

SPEAKERS:
Zuzi Greiner (Instructional Technologist)

Lab Activites for/with Pennies! Makings "Cents" of Science and Math

Saturday, October 28 • 2:40 PM - 3:40 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2206



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
NSTAKC Pennies 2023.pptx

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Using the often discarded coinage, attendees will use the penny, calculators, force sensors, graduated cylinders, and formulas to collect and analyze data. This data will be used to analyze density comparisons of pre- and post- 1982 pennies with scientific as well as mathematical tools. Attendees will also use force sensors to analyze mass and force data to find the acceleration due to gravity. Both activities use slope and graphing knowledge to ensure student success in the science and math classroom, as well as solidifying science skills needed for standardized testing.

TAKEAWAYS:
Learn how to incorporate technology in the science classroom that will solidify concepts learned in the math classroom which directly apply to science.

SPEAKERS:
Chris Coker (Camden Fairview High School: Camden, AR)

Chemistry Lessons in the Science Practices Innovation Notebook (SPIN)

Saturday, October 28 • 2:40 PM - 3:40 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2503 A


STRAND: Tech Tools

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SPIN has 3 customizable lessons for data-focused investigations in Chemistry on Periodic Trends, Thermodynamics, and Stoichiometry. Teachers can also input their own lessons into SPIN. One of the teachers who created the lessons in the notebook will be presenting. The first 30 minutes presenters will give teachers accounts in SPIN and show how students can use the notebook and the metacognitive support features such as the Communication Hub, I’m Stuck button, and SPAARC prompts. Experiences of teachers and students who have used SPIN will be discussed. In the final 30 minutes, teachers will customize a lesson in SPIN or input their own lessons with help from the presenters. By the end of the session, teachers will be able to use SPIN effectively with the ability to share the notebook with all of the teachers at their school. Use of SPIN is entirely free and is found at https://spin.cehd.gmu.edu/login. There are also lessons available in biology, Earth science, and physics.

TAKEAWAYS:
Teachers will learn how to use SPIN to download and edit a lesson from the Global Marketplace or create their own lesson in SPIN. Teachers who have used SPIN note that this has helped their students understand data practices explicitly.

SPEAKERS:
Zachary Minchow-Proffitt (Teacher: Leesburg, VA), Erin Peters-Burton (George Mason University: Fairfax, VA)

Make Your Graph Tell Your Story

Saturday, October 28 • 2:40 PM - 3:40 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 F


STRAND: Tech Tools

Show Details

Students often have ok data but present it graphically not in the best way. Let’s talk about how to make your graph tell your story. Simple stuff like: which type of graph? What variable, where does it go, scale, function or not? Stuff beyond the basics: Which graph is the best type of graph for your data, hypothesis and story? How can I effectively improve my graph to better communicate my results? Does my graph limit the credibility of my work?

TAKEAWAYS:
Effective graphing can be a tool to visually show relationships.

SPEAKERS:
Louise Chapman (Volusia County Schools: Deland, FL), Jacklyn Bonneau (Massachusetts Academy of Math & Science at WPI: Worcester, MA)

Integrating Food Safety and Biotechnology into your Science Classroom

Saturday, October 28 • 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 1501 C


STRAND: STEM Haven

Show Details

Presenters will share the FREE FDA curriculum, Science and Our Food Supply: Investigating Food Safety from Farm to Table. Participants will learn about labs that are easy to conduct in the classroom, to teach students the SCIENCE behind why we wash our hands, avoid cross contamination, cook foods to the appropriate temperatures and use pasteurization. They will also learn about the most common food borne pathogens by creating their own booklet with stickers of bacteria to match the pathogens involved in foodborne illnesses. Teachers will look at the FDA’s curriculum: Exploring Food Agriculture and Biotechnology. Participants will engage in an activity regarding how new cultivars of produce are developed. They will gain the knowledge to lead their students through activities involving genetic engineering practices that affect our food supply. Presenters will also share with participants exciting free professional development opportunities.

TAKEAWAYS:
You will learn how to access the FDA’s FREE curriculum; ways to incorporate Food Safety and Biotechnology into your everyday curriculum, and about FREE. There will be asynchronous professional development opportunities.

SPEAKERS:
Susan Hartley (Hinkley High School: Aurora, CO)

Making Physics Accessible: A Pedagogy For Engaging High School Students Using Socio-Scientific Issues (SSI)

Saturday, October 28 • 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 1501 B



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Dylan Fedell - NSTA23 Workshop Presentation
NSTA23 - Activity1_AllAboutSpeed.pdf
Students gather information on the SSI using teacher-selected articles. The KWL helps students organize information to include in their posters and during the jigsaw activity.
NSTA23 - TakeaStanceActivity.pdf
Students elucidate their initial positions using this CER document.

STRAND: STEM Haven

Show Details

By reframing curricular content already taught by the teacher, a debatable issue introduces and guides each curricular unit by engaging students at the intersection of their current level of scientific understanding and the world outside of the classroom. Students are then navigated through this multi-step process, which deepens their understanding of physics while at the same time developing their stance on the issue using evidence to support their claim. New learning in both transdisciplinary content and student agency aspects allows students to leave the classroom experience empowered to make real changes to their surroundings.

TAKEAWAYS:
Teachers will leave this workshop with hands-on experience engaging in the SSI process from a learner’s perspective, and with a framework for developing and implementing their own.

SPEAKERS:
Dylan Fedell (Palisades High School: Mill Valley, CA)

Integrating Nature-Inspired Invention and Engineering into the Biology Classroom through Case-Based Learning

Saturday, October 28 • 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 F


STRAND: STEM Haven

Show Details

Case, project-based, and invention education lessons for high school students provide context for the learner through real-world scenarios that engage students in inventing while teaching NGSS cross-cutting concepts, scientific processes, engineering, and design. Participants in this workshop will learn how to engage students in nature-inspired invention, engineering, and intellectual property protection through a transdisciplinary lesson about the invention of Velcro. Biological systems and evolutionary adaptations inspire innovations and inventions that spark inventors to solve complex human problems. Participants will learn how to engage their students in creating nature-inspired inventions using resources provided by the US Patent and Trademark Office.

TAKEAWAYS:
Learn how to integrate engineering design with biological concepts through nature-inspired invention and transdisciplinary learning by implementing case, project-based, and invention education.

SPEAKERS:
Jorge Valdes (U.S. Patent and Trademark Office: Alexandria, VA), Reginald Duncan (U.S. Patent and Trademark Office: Alexandria, VA), Kathy Hoppe (STEMisED, Inc: No City, No State)

DCI, CCC, and SEP's Oh My! Sweet and Salty Investigations with a 3-D twist!

Saturday, October 28 • 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 G



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
DCI, CCC, and SEPs Oh My!.pdf

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Visible three-dimensional learning classroom connections can be difficult to assess. In this session, participants will use real-world data collection to determine a phenomenon: why salt is added to freezing roads and when making homemade ice cream, but also is added to boiling water when making pasta. Participants will use the data collected to argue with evidence while creating a visible molecular-level diagram of what occurred. This model will be used to assess student learning of why those phenomena exist.

TAKEAWAYS:
How to use SEPs to drive student instruction and molecular-level modeling of processes using data to support claims.

SPEAKERS:
Jessica Kohout (Educational Consultant: Voorhees, NJ), Stacy Thibodeaux (Southside High School: Youngsville, LA)

Give Data Collection the ROYAL Treatment in Your Science Class

Saturday, October 28 • 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2503 B


STRAND: Tech Tools

Show Details

The integration of science and mathematics should be a natural thing, and it is the foundation of any good STEM teaching. Data collection is crucial in all science classes and the analysis of the data is a great way to bring math into the science classroom. This session will involve all participants in data collection activities that can be done in any classroom, regardless of class size or student background. Common, easy-to-use technology will be used for the activities and this session is sure to motivate teachers to collect and analyze data with their students--and share their results with their math colleagues; fostering a spirit of cross-curricular collaboration and integration.

TAKEAWAYS:
ALL attendees will be active participants in the data collection activities in this session. But collecting data will not be the greatest takeaway. Rather, instilling confidence in ALL attendees to perform mathematical analysis of the data will be the main goal of the session.

SPEAKERS:
Jeffrey Lukens (Retired Science Teacher: Sioux Falls, SD)

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