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2022 Chicago National Conference - Sessions

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Displaying 7 results

Thursday, July 21
8:20 AM - 9:20 AM
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Using tools to sense and interact with the environment

McCormick Place - W193a

After learning about computational thinking, participants will apply the framework to determine where students engage in computational thinking within the activity. Participants will engage in activities where students engineer as part of the investigations. Participants will be able to use a pre-programmed microcontroller (loaned by the presenters) to experience 3 different short investigations each tied to a different phenomenon. 1) Does angle matter? How does the angle of the collector affect how warm it is? Using the microcontroller and lamps participants will collect data to build a model that explains why the tilt of the Earth creates different seasons. 2) Transparent, Translucent, and Opaque. When working in a greenhouse, different materials can be used to cover the greenhouse. Which is the best material for your area? Using the light level sensor on the microcontroller, participants test different materials to recommend their uses when designing a greenhouse. 3) Making an alarm - using the microcontroller accelerometer sensor, participants arm an alarm and see how the accelerometer works in three dimensions. Participants will be provided printed copies of the lesson plans and how to engage students with using the microcontrollers. Note that no knowledge of coding or any equipment brought is necessary to participate in this workshop.

Takeaways: Attendees will learn (1) Microcontrollers are small computers that come with several integrated sensors. Their functionality makes them useful for both investigations and engineering projects. Some of the basic functionality of different microcontrollers (2) One definition of computation thinking is how to use computers to solve problems. Computational thinking activities that connect students to everyday phenomena. The development of algorithms or the decomposition of problems into simple steps are just two examples of processes associated with computation thinking. It is a powerful problem-solving technique that is used in the modern world (3) How engineering tasks provide opportunities for student sensemaking

Speakers

Susan German (Hallsville Middle School: Hallsville, MO), G. Michael Bowen (Mount Saint Vincent University: Halifax, NS)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Using tools to sense and interact with the environment.pdf

Thursday, July 21
8:20 AM - 9:20 AM
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Supporting Civically Engaged Argument Writing in Science and Technology Classrooms

McCormick Place - W178b

Participants will use a graphic organizer to record their thinking as I describe a unit I taught in which students in grades 9-12 explored issues related to artificial intelligence. Students crafted op-Eds advocating for what we should do in our community about emerging technologies like driverless cars and facial recognition. As I describe the unit, I will highlight how I (1) kicked off the unit with a phenomenon that raised questions about convenience, safety, security, equity, and justice; (2) layered on texts and encouraged students to grapple with multiple perspectives on AI-related issues; (3) used routines and mentor texts to support students in crafting claims and connecting evidence to their claims; and (4) engaged students in processes of revision. Then, participants will work in self-selected groups to explore science/technology/society text sets on topics like lab grown meat and space debris. As they explore the text set, they will engage with a classroom routine to develop a compelling, debatable, defensible, and nuanced claim. Participants will share what they discovered as they explored the text set and wrote claims in their group and will reflect on how these text sets and routines might become part of their classroom practice.

Takeaways: Participants will learn about freely available text sets and classroom routines developed by teachers for supporting civically engaged argument writing about science and technology issues in society.

Speakers

John Smith (Chester A Arthur School: Philadelphia, PA)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Guided Session Notes and Resources

Thursday, July 21
9:40 AM - 10:40 AM
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Engineering Severe Weather Solutions

McCormick Place - W176c

Human activities have caused changes in global temperature and weather patterns. This generation of students will need to understand climate science in order to adapt to this changing environment. In this session, participants will explore a project in which students incorporate engineering and basic coding - no experience necessary. We will use micro:bit technology to connect basic coding commands to collect authentic data using embedded sensors. Participants will use this collected data to modify design solutions based on human vulnerabilities to severe weather. Participants will find ways to expose their students to the engineering capabilities needed to solve problems. This project allows students to compare design solutions to identify which is best for the problem at hand and experience the interactive process of evaluating solutions. This project allows for the authentic integration of technology, mathematics, crosscutting concepts, science practices, and easy implementation of the Next Generation Science Standards.

Takeaways: Use technology to expose students to coding and engineering design solutions for severe weather.

Speakers

Jessica Kohout (Howard County Conservancy: Woodstock, MD), Stacy Thibodeaux (Southside High School: Youngsville, LA)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Sever Weather Slide Deck

Thursday, July 21
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
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Intergrated Project and Inquiry Based High School Science Curriculum

McCormick Place - W175c

Explore curriculum of a 10th grade integrated chemistry and biology course that was designed to incorporate the Next Generation Science Standards while placing importance on the Science and Engineering Practices. The course follows the narrative: “Living systems obey the laws of physics and chemistry. Transformations in matter occur in predictable ways and are a function of molecular shape and molecular collisions. Chemical properties are the result of the arrangement of elements and the forces between them. Reception, sequestration, and transfer of chemical elements allow living systems to leverage chemical transformations to survive, grow, and reproduce. Reproduction allows for the transmission of these traits from one generation to the next. Pressures from the environment favors some traits over others which in turn produces new species over time and is responsible for the diversity of all life.” Students were introduced to content via phenomenon and then engaged with the DCIs, Cross-cutting concepts, and SEPs while working towards a culminating project. For example, students learned various topics of chemistry including stoichiometry and gas laws to design and build a functional Class B fire extinguisher. Following this unit, students applied their understanding of cellular respiration, photosynthesis and the carbon cycle to calculate the amount of carbon sequestered on a section of campus trees.

Takeaways: Participants will learn how to use phenomena and a 3D design approach to create project -based, integrated Curriculum that assesses SEPS equally with content. Participants will learn how to use student-centered pedagogical practices, hands-on exploration, and more authentic assessment practices. Participants will be familiar with how Integrating biology, chemistry and environmental standards in order to explore an authentic, real-world problem or challenge increases student engagement and performance.

Speakers

Elizabeth Helfant (Mary Institute and Saint Louis Country Day School: Saint Louis, MO)

Friday, July 22
8:00 AM - 9:00 AM
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Integrating Computer Science into Science Courses Without Losing Your Mind

McCormick Place - W175a

Computer science CAN be integrated into high school science classes. Here are some ideas from the STEMcoding Project!

Takeaways: Attendees will work on three "STEMcoding" activities on: 1. climate change with connection to spreadsheets; 2. orbital motion for Earth science; and 3. the first of the "physics of video games" activities.

Speakers

Chris Orban (The Ohio State University at Marion: Marion, OH)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Orban_nsta22.pdf

Saturday, July 23
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
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Programming Simple Tools to Facilitate Science Inquiry Investigations

McCormick Place - W184d

Participants will learn about the framework for computational thinking and then learn to apply it to science inquiry investigations using Block Coding (used with students in elementary and middle school in many jurisdictions) and how it can be used to improve the conduct of science investigations (and be more like the investigations conducted by scientists).   Participants will apply the computational thinking framework to creating/modifying/using simple programs (either using a free online programming tool OR with a simple, inexpensive microcontroller that will be loaned by the presenters) that can be used in science inquiry investigations either for conducting the investigation (e.g., a random number generator) or for collecting data (e.g., a counter and a timer). Investigations where these can be used will be discussed and demonstrated. The use of the microcontrollers and/or a free online programming tool to develop a simple measurement tool provides participants (and their students) an opportunity to experience a simulated situation a scientist or engineer would face as they use computing tools to develop automated measuring responses.   Finally, as an example of what is known as “physical computing”, participants will learn to build (and will build if time allows) a physical interface (to use with a computer or Chromebook) that allows them to interact with a program they have either written or downloaded.   Participants will be provided printed copies of example lesson plans and instruction sheets on how to engage students with using the Scratch program and the microcontrollers). Note that no knowledge of coding or any equipment is necessary to participate in this workshop. 

Takeaways: Attendees will learn how computational thinking (applied to simple block coding examples and simple micro-controllers) can be used in science classrooms to help students conduct better inquiry investigations and better experience “authentic” science practices.

Speakers

G. Michael Bowen (Mount Saint Vincent University: Halifax, NS), Susan German (Hallsville Middle School: Hallsville, MO)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Programming Simple Tools to Facilitate Science Inquiry Investigations.pdf

Saturday, July 23
2:20 PM - 3:20 PM
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From Typhoid Mary to COVID-19: Pursuing an Understanding of Disease Transmission and Tracking Through Integrative STEM

McCormick Place - W184d

The exploration of the intersection of science and technology at the turn of the 20th century through present times is examined in this session by beginning with the case study of Typhoid Mary and ending with how Integrative STEM has impacted all areas of COVID-19 Participants use the radio function of the MICROBITs, a computer program called infection models to examine how contagious diseases are spread across a population. After considering how Typhoid was tracked at the time Mary Mallon was an asymptomatic cook, participants first try the simulation without any "vaccinated" participants. Then, participants come up with a method(s) for preventing the radio signal from teaching their MICROBIT and participate in the scenario a second time. Data is collected each round and participants solve which one was patient zero.

Takeaways: Engage in a simulation that integrates technology (micro:bits), historical studies, and sense making activities around a current event topic.

Speakers

Susan German (Hallsville Middle School: Hallsville, MO), G. Michael Bowen (Mount Saint Vincent University: Halifax, NS), Christine Anne Royce (Shippensburg University: Shippensburg, PA), Bev DeVore-Wedding (Adams State University: Alamosa, CO)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

From Typhoid Mary to COVID-19.pptx.pdf