2022 Chicago National Conference - Sessions

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Thursday, July 21
2:20 PM - 3:20 PM
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A Rubric Design for Making Sense of Elementary Students’ 3D Knowledge and Understanding.

McCormick Place - W186c

This session explores two key challenges faced by elementary school teachers for promoting 3D learning as outlined by the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS). These are: (1) how to make sense of 3D proficiency based on student responses to assessment tasks, and (2) how to use student responses to inform next steps in instruction. We will address these challenges by guiding participants as they explore a set of 3D assessment tasks that are freely available online. These tasks have been developed in collaboration with teachers for performance expectations in physical science, life science, and earth and space science. During the session, we will highlight how the tasks help elicit what students know and can do. Participants will then learn about the features of the associated rubrics and practice applying rubrics to make sense of student responses. We will also share how information from rubric use can inform next steps in instruction and engage participants in a discussion about instructional decision making. Through this process, participants will learn about rubric features that will inform their own creations and adaptations of rubrics. Furthermore, participants will learn about various resources that are freely available.

Takeaways: Attendees will learn about the features of a new rubric that has been designed based on feedback from elementary school teachers. Through examples and discussions, attendees will learn how the rubric can help them evaluate student responses in a timely manner and provide detailed information about what students know and can do. This information can be valuable in linking student responses to 3D proficiencies and in determining instructional next-steps for teachers.

Speakers

Sania Zaidi (University of Illinois Chicago: Chicago, IL), Samuel Arnold (Research Assistant: Chicago, TX)

Friday, July 22
8:00 AM - 9:00 AM
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Integrating Phenomena and Formative Assessment to Drive Student Inquiry and Support Science Learning in the Elementary Science Classroom.

McCormick Place - W184a

Phenomena is an observable event. In the science classroom, a carefully chosen anchor phenomenon aligns to standards and drives and motivates student learning. Observable, interesting, and complex phenomena add relevance to the science classroom showing students science in their own world guiding them to sense making of science concepts. By centering science instruction on phenomena that students are motivated to explain, the focus of learning shifts from learning about a topic to figuring out why or how something happens. For example, instead of simply learning about the topics of photosynthesis and mitosis, students are engaged in building evidence-based explanatory ideas that help them figure out how a tree grows. The purpose of this session is to build elementary school teachers’ understanding of introducing students to phenomena and show teachers how to leverage their current curriculum by integrating an anchor phenomena and complementary formative assessment. To do so, teacher participants will engage in multiple classroom-tested examples of authentic anchor phenomena in grade levels 3-5. The session will involve the following activities. First, teacher participants will identify and review methods for using phenomena to elicit students’ ideas, personal experiences and language to drive instruction. Then participants will engage in multiple types of phenomena in the elementary science classroom and furthermore, recognize and utilize different types of formative assessments to capture students’ sense making of each phenomena. Lastly, participants will develop their own practical action strategies for integrating phenomenon with formative assessment to support student sense making. Teacher participants will have access to web-based, teacher-created, classroom-tested tools. These tools will be used for the culminating event of creating actions strategies for their own classroom practice.

Takeaways: Participants will identify and review methods for using phenomena to elicit students’ ideas, personal experiences and language to drive instruction. They will recognize and utilize different types of formative assessments to capture students’ sense making of phenomena.

Speakers

Elizabeth Thiel (Purdue University: West Lafayette, IN)

Friday, July 22
10:40 AM - 11:40 AM
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NGSS-Aligned Assessments for Formative Use in the Elementary Classroom

McCormick Place - W181b

This session will provide an introduction to the freely available Next Generation Science Assessment (NGSA) Elementary (Grades 3-5) task portal (https://ngss-assessment.portal.concord.org/elementary-school) and the companion virtual learning community (VLC), Understanding Progress in Science (https://www.upinscience.org/). The NGSA Elementary tasks are multidimensional and aligned with NGSS performance expectations. They were co-developed with teachers and can work with any curriculum. The Understanding Progress in Science VLC provides additional resources, support, and community of practice dedicated to using assessment tasks formatively in elementary science. Participants can learn more about why and how to use NGSA Elementary tasks, get help understanding student responses and using rubrics, and discuss how to use student responses to guide instruction. During this Bring Your Own Device hands-on workshop, we will share examples of how teachers have used the tasks, sample student responses, and instructional next steps. Then we will guide attendees as they explore the NGSA Elementary tasks and consider how to integrate them into their teaching. Participants will also have the opportunity to explore the resources within the Understanding Progress in Science VLC that can support the formative use of tasks in their classrooms.

Takeaways: Attendees will learn how to access and use two related, freely available online resources that support elementary teachers’ use of NGSS-aligned assessment and instruction: A website with tasks aligned with the performance expectations for Grades 3-5 and a virtual learning community around using assessments formatively in the classroom.

Speakers

Liz Lehman (The University of Chicago: Chicago, IL), Brian Gane (University of Illinois Chicago: Chicago, IL), Sania Zaidi (University of Illinois Chicago: Chicago, IL)

Friday, July 22
3:40 PM - 4:40 PM
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Using Three-dimensional Assessment Prompts to Drive Student Sense-making

McCormick Place - W175c

The Vision set forth by A Framework for K-12 Science Education and the Next Generation Science Standards emphasize science as the integration of practices (SEPs), content (DCIs), and big ideas (CCCs). By using all three dimensions, students are able to make sense of phenomena while learning science concepts and processes. However, this way of thinking and learning takes practice and guidance. Teachers play a pivotal role in helping their students to engage with this kind of science learning. Therefore, they must find ways to explicitly integrate and embed all three dimensions in activities, lessons, and assessments. This participatory presentation will explore how teachers can explicitly embed SEPs, DCIs, and CCCs into prompts (questions and guiding statements) to promote more integrated opportunities for student sense-making. By generating prompts that include SEPs, DCIs, and CCCs, teachers can guide students to think in a more three-dimensional way and gain the skills to do so outside of the classroom. Attendees will identify strategies for posing integrated prompts, consider the benefits of multi-dimensional prompts for students, practice asking and improving prompts, and apply these strategies to use in their own classroom context.

Takeaways: Creating prompts (questions and guiding statements) that explicitly promote the three dimensions can drive more integrated, equitable student learning

Speakers

Ana Houseal (University of Wyoming: Laramie, WY), Clare Gunshenan (University of Wyoming: Laramie, WY), Martha Inouye (University of Wyoming: Laramie, WY)

Saturday, July 23
8:00 AM - 9:00 AM
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Asking the Students: Creating and Implementing a Metacognitive Data Tracker for Assessments

McCormick Place - W179a

Data meetings are as much of a reality to K–12 teachers and students as high-stakes testing. In this session we will share a data tool, as well as the surprising results we have collected so far, to help teachers in understanding students' struggles by asking the students directly what aspect of the assessment they struggled with the most. Our findings are serving students and teachers by improving Tier 1 instruction planning and delivery as well as leading to a much richer and in-depth conversation during data meetings.

Takeaways: Teachers will be given the knowledge and tools to implement our Metacognitive Data Tracker in order to improve Tier 1 instruction.

Speakers

Rocco Williams (Fort Worth ISD: Fort Worth, TX), Yohanis De La Fuente (Tarleton State University: Crowley, TX)