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Next Generation Science Standards

Common Core, in 9 Year-old eyes

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Patricia Rourke Patricia Rourke 45925 Points

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/06/15/education/common-core-in-9-year-old-eyes.html?emc=eta1&_r=0 Here is an interesting article on Common Core from the NY Times on Sunday, June 15. Common Core, in 9-Year-Old Eyes BY JAVIER C. HERNÁNDEZ Chrispin Alcindor, a Brooklyn fourth grader, was once a top student. But rigorous new academic standards — and the exams that accompany them — have frayed his confidence. What are your thoughts? How is your school and district approaching the Common Core?

Debbie Rexing Debbie Rexing 270 Points

Here is an interesting article on Common Core from the NY Times on Sunday, June 15. Common Core, in 9-Year-Old Eyes BY JAVIER C. HERNÁNDEZ Chrispin Alcindor, a Brooklyn fourth grader, was once a top student. But rigorous new academic standards — and the exams that accompany them — have frayed his confidence. What are your thoughts? How is your school and district approaching the Common Core? My thoughts...when my school changed to Common Core this year, and since I get a lot of the higher performing and "GATE" students, I have noticed a drop in the higher students' motivation to go beyond. As an educator, I need to find "creative" adventures to encourage those higher learners to also think beyond in their answers and responses. Currently searching....

Ava Aldcroft Ava Aldcroft 595 Points

Loved hearing about the Common Core in this perspective. The standards are rigorous and academically challenging, but as mentioned in the video, it's important that students learn to be critical thinkers. Too be honest, I wish I had these standards growing up.

Carolyn Mohr Carolyn Mohr 89208 Points

Hi Patty, I am having a difficult time understanding how this student can be a top student one year and at the bottom the next if he is in the same school district. Wouldn't one be able to assume that he is still with the same peer group, all taking the same tests? Perhaps there are other things at play besides CCSS. That being said, I sense from colleagues' comments and my own look at the Common Core that they are a very rigorous set of standards. It would be sad, indeed, if so much of the writing to be done in schools becomes so structured and fabricated that children like this one would never have an opportunity to write what is in the heart. Carolyn

Brynna Malen Brynna Malen 290 Points

I tend to agree with Carolyn for the most part. However, Common Core is just a different way of learning in which students will have more freedom in how to show and learn knowledge. I believe it is a more effective way of letting students explore their own questions and discovering information on their own. They can be more creative in their projects and assignments. I think educators are scaring themselves more than they need to about Common Core.

Susan German Susan German 32140 Points

I think the issue most have with Common Core is with the implementation of the standards in the classroom. I think educators have confused rigorous with complicated or highly structured. I agree that there is a lot of possibilities available to an educator using Common Core. We just need to get our creative hats on and start reading and THINKING about the standards and what they mean.

Kathy Renfrew Kathleen Renfrew 35878 Points

I think the Common Core standards were written to bring us( my hand is raised) out of our complaisance as educators. We need to use the CC standards to help us leverage NGSS science instruction. I remember one of my last years' work in the classroom. I might as well have have written the answers in their mathematics books. I do think there is room for differentiation to meet the needs of the students. I don't believe in a one size fits all. We need to meet the standards but no one is telling us exactly how to do it. In order for students to meet the expectations of NGSS, students will need the skills they have learned in math and ELA I am also hoping that Crispin was getting some additional help. Whether CC or NGSS quality instruction doesn't change. Kathy Kathy

It might be interesting to pose some of these questions raised from this article in the next virtual conference on Aug 6th [b] Connecting Literacy and Science with NGSS and Common Core[/b] learningcenter.nsta.org/products/online_courses/VirtualConference.aspx Science class provides the perfect context for practicing, even bolstering, important skills learned in other disciplines, including the crucial skills of reading, writing, and argumentation. Learn how to use the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) to improve literacy skills among your students with this NSTA Virtual Conference. During this web-based professional learning opportunity participants will: • Explore the connections between NGSS and the Common Core for Literacy in Science and Technical Subjects • Learn about specific strategies integrating literacy and science instruction • Ask questions of NGSS experts • Engage in dialogue with educators from across the country

Kathy Renfrew Kathleen Renfrew 35878 Points

Arlene, I think your suggestion is an excellent one. During the Virtual conference we should have the opportunity to dig deeply into some of our questions. Kathy I for one am looking forward to this AWESOME professional learning expereince.

Here is a flyer about the Wednesday August 6th virtual conference on Science and Literacy: Common Core and NGSS Link for more information http://learningcenter.nsta.org/virtualconference

Beth Eisentraut Beth Eisentraut 925 Points

I agree with Carolyn as well. It is very disturbing that a child could go from being the top of a class to the bottom in one year. It is mentioned in the article that dad was no longer living with the family. I am sure this personal upheaval played into both boys' school performance as well as the CC change. CC was rolled out very quickly in many districts did not have teachers trained in the logistics. I think this would be particularly difficult in districts where teachers have less support. Both brothers didn't seem to understand the vocabulary that their sister picked up quickly. They might not be able to do what is asked of them because it is assumed that they understand the question, when in fact more explanation is necessary. -Beth Eisentraut

Jill Dimitriou Jill Dimitriou 445 Points

This is a very interesting article. Thank you for sharing it.

KRISTEN TROLINGER KRISTEN TROLINGER 325 Points

This is an interesting perspective. thank you

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