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Teaching Chemistry with a Limited Budget

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Elaine Thomas Elaine Thomas 1525 Points

I would like to teach in a low income area and was wondering if I am on a limited budget, what are some cost efficient ways to have some fun chemistry experiments?

Cris DeWolf Cris DeWolf 11965 Points

You can make your own universal indicator (for pH) using red cabbage. There are many inexpensive household substances that have a variety of pH that your students can test. You can find many activities using red cabbage indicator online. Here is one example: http://www.stanford.edu/~ajspakow/downloads/outreach/ph-student-9-30-09.pdf A limiting reactant lab using vinegar and baking soda and balloons is also fun and inexpensive: http://serc.carleton.edu/sp/mnstep/activities/26339.html I found this manual of activities as well: http://www.csub.edu/stem/REVSUP_Manual.pdf

Carolyn Mohr Carolyn Mohr 92316 Points

Hi Elaine,
There is another discussion thread in the Learning Center Community Forums about Low Cost Chemistry Labs that you might find helpful.
Carolyn

Patricia Rourke Patricia Rourke 45925 Points

There is a recipe for home made indicators and other experiments based on items available in grocery stores in this site: Kitchen Chemistry The poster has used most of these experiments and demonstrations with elementary school kids--mostly K through 6th grades. A few have been used with college students. One or two have not been personally tested. Top of Page | Cabbage | Candy | Ice Cream | Veggies | Iron | Popcorn Soap | Vitamin C | Lifesavers | Yeast | DNA http://home.ntelos.net/~rollinso/SciFood.html Also searching the web using key words 'kitchen chemistry' identifies many interesting sites, even a free ware course from MIT. This site from Penn State also may have a few interesting tidbits: http://foodscience.psu.edu/youth/youth

Patricia Rourke Patricia Rourke 45925 Points

A search with the key words 'kitchen chemistry' offers 4 resources from the NSTA Learning Center: 1. a book chapter: Kitchen Chemistry By: Christine Anne Royce Grade Level: Elementary School 2. a journal article: Teaching Through Trade Books: Kitchen Chemistry By: Christine Anne Royce Grade Level: Elementary School 3. Science & Children article: Someone’s in the Kitchen with Science By: Patricia K. Lowry and Judy Hale McCrary Grade Level: Elementary School 4. another journal article: The Biology of Food By: J. Jose Bonner Grade Level: College, High School

Pamela Auburn Pamela Auburn 68625 Points

My collection of linked resources has gotten so large that it may not be possible to open the entire collection but I thought worth a try. Also have a look at "Illustrated Guide to Home Chemistry Experiments" by Robert Thompson

Kitchen Chemistry Collection (10 items)
- User Uploaded Resource
- User Uploaded Resource
- User Uploaded Resource
Kitchen Chemistry Collection (10 items)
- User Uploaded Resource
- User Uploaded Resource
- User Uploaded Resource
Lance Meibos Lance Meibos 270 Points

Thanks for posting all these links and resources! I'm finding myself in a similar situation.

Ruth Hutson Ruth Hutson 64765 Points

I would concur with Adah. One can also find organic compounds like fructose and certain enzymes at local health food stores. Check out the MSDS sheet for alternative names for chemicals and look for those names in the store.

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