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Early Childhood

Differentiation

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Valerie Green Valerie Green 480 Points

Hi,

I'm wondering if anyone has any ideas of differentiation techniques? I know it needs to be specific for idividual students but just asking if there are things you have used that have been successful? Especially maybe with nonverbal students that are not yet using assistive devices?

 

Thank You

Melissa Biddinger Melissa Biddinger 435 Points

Hi Valerie,

       Similar to Wendy, I have worked with children who are nonverbal where picture boards and Velcro are effective learning materials to use.  I am not aware of the students’ writing ability or expressive skills, but you could allow them to demonstrate their knowledge of class material in nonverbal ways, such as by allowing them to draw or engage in some other creative form of expression.  For example, if you are teaching them about characteristics of fall, you could have them go through magazines to collect fall related photos and create a collage with these images.  This allows them to demonstrate their understanding of what things can be found in the fall in a nonverbal way. 

      In addition, when teaching students who are nonverbal, you could also assess their understanding of the material by having them use different colored flashcards to represent different ideas.  For example, if you teach the students about sink or float, you could have them hold up a green flashcard if the item floats or an orange flashcard if the item sinks.  Again, this allows you to gauge their understanding in a nonverbal way.

        Finally, presenting your material in a variety of ways is effective for all students regardless of their language ability.  For example, if you are teaching your students about farm animals, have the students listen to the sounds they make, show pictures of different farm animals and maybe a stuffed animal that they can pass around, and/ read stories with vivid images of these animals to give the students both visual and auditory information. 

Hope this helps, 

Melissa 

Sadee Koehler Sadee Koehler 2895 Points

Hi Valerie!

Currently, I am a student at the University of Northern Iowa. I am studying Early Childhood Education with a minor in Special Education. It is hard to give specific ideas because it is different with every student, depending on their own need. I feel over the years a lot of new advices have been discovered that help many different students needs. A guy that I went to high school with had down syndrome and was non-verbal, an amazing device that I saw him use was device that looked like an IPAD. The device had different bottons that he would press to communicate with others what he was thinking or feeling. It was always fun to see him use the device because he would be full of smiles when he could communicate with others. 

Other great differiention techniques could be to create learning stations, run literature circles, give different sets of reading comprehension activities, and analyze your differientiated instruction strategy on a regular basis. 

There are so many great tools out there! Thank you for the discussion! 

Sadee Koehler Sadee Koehler 2895 Points

Hi Valerie!

Currently, I am a student at the University of Northern Iowa. I am studying Early Childhood Education with a minor in Special Education. It is hard to give specific ideas because it is different with every student, depending on their own need. I feel over the years a lot of new advices have been discovered that help many different students needs. A guy that I went to high school with had down syndrome and was non-verbal, an amazing device that I saw him use was device that looked like an IPAD. The device had different bottons that he would press to communicate with others what he was thinking or feeling. It was always fun to see him use the device because he would be full of smiles when he could communicate with others. 

Other great differiention techniques could be to create learning stations, run literature circles, give different sets of reading comprehension activities, and analyze your differientiated instruction strategy on a regular basis. 

There are so many great tools out there! Thank you for the discussion! 

Sadee Koehler Sadee Koehler 2895 Points

Hi Valerie!

Currently, I am a student at the University of Northern Iowa. I am studying Early Childhood Education with a minor in Special Education. It is hard to give specific ideas because it is different with every student, depending on their own need. I feel over the years a lot of new advices have been discovered that help many different students needs. A guy that I went to high school with had down syndrome and was non-verbal, an amazing device that I saw him use was device that looked like an IPAD. The device had different bottons that he would press to communicate with others what he was thinking or feeling. It was always fun to see him use the device because he would be full of smiles when he could communicate with others. 

Other great differiention techniques could be to create learning stations, run literature circles, give different sets of reading comprehension activities, and analyze your differientiated instruction strategy on a regular basis. 

There are so many great tools out there! Thank you for the discussion! 

Wendy Miranda Wendy Miranda 450 Points

Hi Valerie, 

I did one of my lessons today and I have some students who are non verbal. I used velcro along with the objects that I brought in and included pictures for them to look at. Maybe working with velcro and using (push buttons) that records your voice, allowing them to press down to hear an answer. 

Molly Karr Molly Karr 2985 Points

Hello, differentation strategies seem to be a difficult concept, along with many other things in the classroom. I don't have a lot of information or experience with this although I have learned some ideas through my college course. I would recommend using visuals with everything you do. For example when you are reading science content, or giving instruction, make pictures of the main ideas and have a para or a responsible students point at the pictures as they are being talked about. These students seem to really strive when they learn visually. I am not sure on the exact difficulties with your particular student but this ideas seems to be useful for most. Good luck, and be open minded. 

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