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2022 Chicago National Conference - Sessions

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Displaying 13 results

Thursday, July 21
8:20 AM - 9:20 AM
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Engaging with Data using CODAP in InquiryHub 3D Storylined Biology

McCormick Place - W196a

Analyzing and interpreting data and using mathematical and computational reasoning are complex at the high school level, which requires students to employ correlational and causational thinking while manipulating visualizations using tools. CODAP, a product of the Concord Consortium, is designed to give students access to these powerful practices with minimal software requirements and with a mission to make data literacy accessible for all students. InquiryHub uses CODAP to provide students with agency because they can determine the variables of interest, in which to create graphical representations from the same data set. In our free, open-source program, students can work with authentic datasets from the CODAP website, data they gather, or data from professional studies. Inside our storyline instructional sequences, inquiryHub leverages CODAP as students analyze the rainfall on the Serengeti and how it correlates to wildebeest populations. In the session, participants will try out CODAP by adding multiple variables of data to answer the question, “What’s happening to large animals on the Serengeti plain?” and how to apply CODAP in their classroom.

Takeaways: CODAP can be used in many different three-dimensional ways to have students analyze and interpret data to make sense of phenomena while providing student agency.

Speakers

Jamie Deutch Noll (Northwestern University: Evanston, IL), Kate Henson (University of Colorado Boulder: Boulder, CO)

Thursday, July 21
9:40 AM - 10:40 AM
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Half-Earth Project Inclusive Mapping Design Challenge and Hummingbird Guided Inquiry

McCormick Place - W196a

The Half-Earth Project team-based Mapping Design Challenge engages students in authentic teamwork to use digital mapping to design their own biodiversity conservation choices.

Takeaways: Digital mapping motivated by exploring charismatic species draws diverse students into the multidisciplinary science of conservation decision-making where species, human impacts, and stakeholders have to be considered.

Speakers

Dennis Liu (E.O. Wilson Biodiversity Foundation: Durham, NC), Jenna Adams (Baltimore City Public Schools: Baltimore, MD)

Thursday, July 21
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
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How POGIL Promotes Equitable Education Access

McCormick Place - W196a

Participants will learn the benefits of the POGIL instructional technique in which students work in small groups on specially designed guided inquiry materials. While lessons are available online or in books, many teachers do not understand how to implement a POGIL lesson. This presentation is designed to introduce teachers to tools for successful implementation of POGIL lessons in their schools. Participants will experience a POGIL ­ learning environment, which is designed to include participation by all students. Activities will be analyzed to understand how guided inquiry is structured in a POGIL classroom. We will consider classroom facilitation issues related to implementation. Learn more at www.POGIL.org

Takeaways: Students work together in small groups to discover concepts and develop confidence as learners

Speakers

Kathleen Dwyer , Kathleen Dwyer (MRH Middle School: Saint Louis, MO)

Thursday, July 21
2:20 PM - 3:20 PM
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Using the Scientific Process to Conquer Smallpox

McCormick Place - W196a

We can examine natural phenomena and address wicked problems using the scientific process. The smallpox virus emerged approximately 10,000 years ago, and the virus's global spread devastated civilizations. Thanks to the scientific thinking of a Buddhist nun, a milkmaid, and Edward Jenner, smallpox was declared eradicated in 1979 by the World Health Organization. To support the understanding of the nature of science in the NGSS (Appendix H), session participants will engage in activities that demonstrate how science is used to answer questions about the natural world through a process that is consistent, observational, natural, predictable, tentative, and testable. Additionally, participants will examine various media sources to learn how to identify scientific misinformation and the tactics used to make misinformation appear credible. The National Center for Science Education supports science teachers through free professional development and curriculum to recognize and address science misconceptions using the three dimensions of the NGSS. Resources: https://ncse.ngo/supporting-teachers/classroom-resources

Takeaways: This session introduces participants to a basic understanding of the scientific process, how our knowledge of the natural world evolves with new evidence, and that science cannot answer questions that do not pertain to natural processes. Attendees will take a deep dive into an NGSS storyline sequence developed to help students understand that science is an ongoing process that must be supported by multiple lines of evidence to be accepted by the scientific community.

Speakers

Lin Andrews (National Center for Science Education: Oakland, CA), DeeDee Wright (Colorado State University: Fort Collins, CO), Cari Herndon (District of Columbia Public Schools: Washington, DC), Blake Touchet , Ayesha Alirahi (Science Teacher: , 0)

Friday, July 22
8:00 AM - 9:00 AM
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From CRISPR to 23 and Me: The Revolution in Human Genetics

McCormick Place - W196a

Techniques such as CRISPR, mitochondrial transfer, and mRNA therapeutics have opened up new possibilities for genetic manipulation, bringing new possibilities to energize the biology curriculum.

Takeaways: We will explore the specifics of how these powerful genetic engineering techniques work and discuss ways to incorporate them into the curriculum.

Speakers

Kenneth Miller (Brown University: Providence, RI)

Friday, July 22
10:40 AM - 11:40 AM
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A Cancer Case Study Storyline and Research Lesson

McCormick Place - W196a

Enjoy conversation about our research lesson collaboration with the University of Chicago Comprehensive Cancer Center EYES (Educators and Youth Enjoy Science) teacher research experience.

Takeaways: Authentic teacher research experiences can catalyze students' career interest, authentic classroom inquiry, curriculum development, and relevant professional learning.

Speakers

Steven Rogg (Coherent Learning Design: Lindenhurst, IL), Pamela Wagner (North Lawndale College Prep High School: Chicago, IL)

Friday, July 22
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
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3-D Learning for a Sustainable World

McCormick Place - W196a

Three-dimensional learning, as outlined by NGSS, allows students to view science as an interrelated world of inquiry. Today’s environmental challenges require a 3-D approach to understand the phenomena and data and how our landscapes and ecosystems have changed as human population has doubled in the past 50 years. In this hands-on session, the presenter will lead participants in hands-on activities (problem-solving challenges, simulations and modeling) that use real-world data sets and 3-D learning in a variety of formats to analyze and think critically about some of the key ecological topics in Biology and Environmental Science courses (including AP) – population trends, climate change, land use, biodiversity, and ecosystem health. Presented activities emphasize students’ ability to collect, analyze and interpret data as central to developing and using models, identifying patterns and designing solutions. The presenter will also share interactive digital tools for engaging students remotely. The presenter will discuss how to implement these activities as part of broadening students’ understanding of the NGSS topics “Human Sustainability” and “Interdependent Relationships in Ecosystems. Participants will receive lesson plans (including assessment ideas) and background materials in an electronic format.

Takeaways: Participants will come away with cross-disciplinary ideas to incorporate 3-D learning strategies into hands-on activities around the NGSS topic of Human Sustainability.

Speakers

Stephanie Ruder (J.I. Case High School: Racine, WI), Pam Wasserman (Population Connection: Washington, DC)

Friday, July 22
2:20 PM - 3:20 PM
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Tick-Borne Diseases and One Health: Connecting Humans, Animals, and the Environment

McCormick Place - W196a

Investigate the spread of tick-borne diseases in humans and animals. Experience hands-on/minds-on NGSS-focused lessons related to One Health, the connections between human, animal, and environmental health.

Takeaways: Learn about hands-on/minds-on NGSS-focused lessons related to One Health and engage in three-dimensional activities that focus on the science practices of analyzing data and constructing explanations.

Speakers

Lisa Brosnick (North Collins Central School District: North Collins, NY), Dina Markowitz (University of Rochester: Rochester, NY)

Friday, July 22
3:40 PM - 4:40 PM
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Computational Thinking Using Computer Simulations in High School Biology

McCormick Place - W196a

While the NGSS emphasizes the science and engineering practice of computational thinking, there is less familiarity and support for the implementation of this practice compared to other practices. In this session, high school biology teachers will learn how to recognize if a task requires computational thinking or not by analyzing a set of tasks. They will learn how to promote computational thinking in their classrooms by engaging with a newly developed computer simulation. This freely available simulation is based on a real-world phenomenon and designed to address specific performance expectations in biology. Teachers will explore the simulation as learners first, engaging with it as their students would. Then they will reflect on how they used computational thinking to explain the phenomenon. Teachers will leave the session with access to the simulation, suggestions for lesson plans, ideas for incorporating the activity into their curricula, and strategies for utilizing the simulation with all learners in their classrooms.

Takeaways: Participants will learn how to promote the science and engineering practice of computational thinking in the high school biology classroom. Participants will be introduced to a freely accessible computer simulation (and suggested lesson plans) based on a real-world phenomenon designed to address performance expectations in biology.

Speakers

Wendy Jackson (The Lawrence Hall of Science: Berkeley, CA), Maia Binding (The Lawrence Hall of Science: Berkeley, CA), Timothy Hurt (The Lawrence Hall of Science: Berkeley, CA), Ben Koo (The Lawrence Hall of Science: Berkeley, CA)

Saturday, July 23
9:20 AM - 10:20 AM
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Nourish the Future: Energy and Biofuels

McCormick Place - W196a

Students utilize different components (enzymes, yeast, feed stocks, and water) to produce ethanol and carbon dioxide through the process of fermentation. Students will develop a model of fermentation and explain how ethanol is made to answer the focus question "How can fermentation produce a renewable fuel source?" Students will develop experimental models to generate data in order to construct explanations about the relationships between the components of the fermentation process and to predict how those relationships can be manipulated to produce carbon dioxide. Students will design solutions to make the fermentation process as efficient as possible and generate the maximum amount of ethanol in a small bag environment Attendees will participate in hands-on activities centered around biofuel. Participants are going to prepare and compare different amounts of fermentation occurring in four different mixtures which will allow observations of production rates. A second activity focuses on a way to make a qualitative or quantitative explanation regarding the relationship between feed stock and glucose availability for ethanol production. Participants will deconstruct a model of starch to examine enzyme and starch reactions to determine how starches change into smaller molecules. Three additional hands-on activities that can be included in your classroom curriculum will be discussed.

Takeaways: Nourish the Future is a national education initiative developed by science teachers for science teachers to connect students to modern agriculture and provide sound science based resources that meet teacher and student needs in the classroom.

Speakers

Tiska Rodgers (Hayti High School: Hayti, MO), Leanne Thele (Jackson R-2 School District: Jackson, MO)

Saturday, July 23
10:40 AM - 11:40 AM
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IMMUNOLOGY! Using a Board Game to Model a Biological Process

McCormick Place - W196a

Interactive games are an engaging and effective way to review biology concepts if learning the game rules does not interfere with learning the biology. We have developed IMMUNOLOGY! an easy board game whose object is to "get all of your immune system’s components from START to the infection”. The game is designed to model the process of an immune response, as the game’s pieces are cells and proteins used in the response to infection. To win, players must use the pieces in the proper order and answer questions about immunity along the way. Following the activity, students apply their understanding to discuss vaccine function. IMMUNOLOGY! was developed as a review activity for postsecondary introductory microbiology class, but it could easily be customized to a variety of biological processes at multiple levels of instruction. In this presentation we will show how to construct the IMMUNOLOGY! game and how to play it. Finally, we will demonstrate how the game could be modified to teach other biological concepts/processes such central dogma, photosynthesis, respiration, cell division in a fun and interactive way.

Takeaways: Attendees will learn how to use a board game to model a biological process and make their own to use in their classroom.

Speakers

Alicia Cecil (University of Indianapolis: Indianapolis, IN), Mary Gobbett (University of Indianapolis: Indianapolis, IN)

Saturday, July 23
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
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Good is Good Enough? Linking the Evolution of Horses and Environmental Change

McCormick Place - W196a

Horses have an extraordinary fossil record in North America, with specimens from the early Eocene (about 55 Ma) to just the last 10,000 years. The primary dietary strategy in horses changed from browsing –- like that of a giraffe –-to grazing –- like that of modern horses, as seen in the evolution of the higher-crowned teeth. The evolution of tooth structure strongly correlates to variations in the ecosystem due to a changing climate. To support the understanding of NGSS HS-LS4 Biological Evolution: Unity and Diversity, session participants will engage in the analysis of hypsodonty -- the height of the tooth relative to its overall size -- of fossil replicas to track the evolution of dietary strategy in this lineage to construct an explanation based on evidence to support the claim that changes in environmental conditions may result in the emergence of new species over time. Additionally, participants will communicate their newly gained knowledge in analyzing how horse evolution is depicted in museum displays and design an accurate phylogenetic representation. The National Center for Science Education supports science teachers through free professional development and curriculum to recognize and address science misconceptions using the three dimensions of the NGSS. Resources: https://ncse.ngo/supporting-teachers/classroom-resources

Takeaways: Natural selection acts on genetic variation within populations as individuals who are adapted to survive in the environment reproduce and pass on their genes. Attendees will have the opportunity to work hands-on with a variety of 3D-printed horse teeth dating back to the Eocene to understand how a changing climate played a role in the dietary evolution of horses.

Speakers

Lin Andrews (National Center for Science Education: Oakland, CA), DeeDee Wright (Colorado State University: Fort Collins, CO), Cari Herndon (District of Columbia Public Schools: Washington, DC), Blake Touchet (National Center for Science Education: Oakland, CA)

Saturday, July 23
2:20 PM - 3:20 PM
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Engaging Students in the Science and Engineering of Food

McCormick Place - W196a

Obtaining food to meet our energy and matter needs is a basic requirement of humans and food also defines our culture. This presentation will share how to use elements of the three dimensions of the NGSS and Framework to engage students in making sense of phenomena and problems related to food. Strategies for how to use driving question boards, lesson level learning targets, and engage all learners will be shared. Specific attention will be given for how to align assessments that challenge students to apply their understandings. Participants will engage in a morsel of a storyline on producing the perfect apple. In this storyline, students notice and wonder about different varieties of apples and are challenged to explain why it took 30 years for the Honeycrisp apple to be available to consumers. Students ask questions for how perfect apples are mass produced, how nutrients and environmental factors affect the quality of fruit, and how to attain the right balance of sweet-tart flavor. This storyline weaves together scientific concepts such as meiosis and mitosis, pedigrees and probability, plant structure and function, nutrient cycles, the role of photosynthesis in producing food, and how plants use cellular respiration to survive the winter.

Takeaways: Engage in conversations for how to use the three dimensions of the NGSS and the NRC Framework, storylines, driving questions, formative and summative assessments, and hands-on activities to learn science and engineering skills while making sense of one of our most basic needs – FOOD.

Speakers

Chris Embry Mohr (Olympia High School: Stanford, IL)