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2022 Chicago National Conference - Sessions

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Displaying 7 results

Friday, July 22
10:40 AM - 11:40 AM
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Using Earth and Space Science Storylines to Anchor a High School Physics Class

McCormick Place - W195

Let's explore creative storylines for integrating up-to-date, research-driven Earth and space science into high school physics courses.

Takeaways: 1. Earth and space science storylines provide engaging avenues for students to learn fundamental physics core ideas and reinforce understandings of both crosscutting concepts and science and engineering practices; 2. Most of the classical physics curriculum originated within fields of Earth and space science, so aspects of geophysics integrate naturally within a modern high school physics curriculum; and 3. For most high schools, aligning a high school curriculum with the NGSS requires the addition of a substantial amount of Earth and space science, and integrating relevant geophysical content into a high school course can help do this.

Speakers

Michael Wysession (Washington University in St. Louis: Saint Louis, MO)

Friday, July 22
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
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PBL Learning in the Physics Classroom- a year long journey

McCormick Place - W195

Presentation outlines four project based learning units related to a central theme, what do we need to survive and thrive. The first unit is a Forces and motion unit where the culminating project is to design an object to protect a valuable object from the force of a collision. The second unit explores waves through the context of music. Students think about the role of culture and music in thriving and then learn about how waves work through designing their own instruments from recycled materials. The energy unit focuses on sustainable energy, conservation of energy as well as mirrors and optics as students build either their own solar collectors or their own solar ovens and finally students study projectiles through writing their own bow and arrow user safety manual. Participants will leave with ready to use Project based units. Participants will have time to brainstorm modifications to one unit of choice to make it applicable to their personal teaching style and setting.

Takeaways: Participants will leave with ready to use PBL Physics units as well as have time to modify those units to make them their own.

Speakers

Sara Plowman (Millennium High School: Santa Monica, CA)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Music Project Folder
https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/15CxV3iPSte05jvUEQlqYffUW4ZQa0UGY?usp=sharing
Music Project Folder
Solar Water Heater Project
Circuits/Solar Cell Project
Collision Unit
Sail Car Unit- Newton's Laws
Note- Not a pbl unit per se but including it because it includes materials that I use to get kids ready for the Collision unit.

Friday, July 22
2:20 PM - 3:20 PM
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Modeling Investigation of How Quarks Obtain Mass Through the Interaction of the Higgs Boson

McCormick Place - W195

Each attendee will receive materials and instructions to construct a Higgs Boson. Dice and investigative procedure are included to determine the mass of six quarks.

Takeaways: 1. How to take an abstract concept and create concrete hands-on investigations; 2. Suggestions to go from teacher-centered to a student centered-curriculum; and 3. The importance of looking for trends, patterns, and regularities for modeling.

Speakers

Gary Schiltz (Retired Chemistry Teacher: Naperville, IL)

Friday, July 22
3:40 PM - 4:40 PM
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The Quantitative and Qualitative Modeling of the Doppler Effect

McCormick Place - W195

The first 50 attendees will be be given the materials (circluar rings, rulers, and paper) to model the Doppler effect. Attendees will need a calculator for the quantitative portion of the workshop.

Takeaways: 1. How to take an abstract concept and create a concrete hands-on investigation; 2. Suggestions to go from teacher-centered to a student centered-curriculum; and 3. The importance of looking for trends, patterns, and regularities for modeling.

Speakers

Gary Schiltz (Retired Chemistry Teacher: Naperville, IL)

Saturday, July 23
8:00 AM - 9:00 AM
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Cosmology in the Classroom

McCormick Place - W196c

Students are generally intrigued by cosmology but it can be difficult for instructors to explain. For some scientists and teachers, the famous Hubble graph from which we obtain Hubble’s Law makes it obvious that the universe is expanding but for most students (and many of us teachers!) this is not the case: looking at the graph does not obviously imply an expanding universe. We will discuss standard candles and the redshifting of light, and how Hubble used these to measure the speeds and distances to galaxies. We will examine his data and graph and then we will work through an activity that will help students see why the 1929 graph implies an expanding universe. The simple activity uses elastic and rulers and provides a qualitative introduction to the Hubble redshift. Additionally, we will share other ideas and materials for teaching students about cosmology and the expansion of the universe.

Takeaways: Students can produce a Hubble-like graph representing an expanding universe using elastic and a ruler.

Speakers

Todd Brown (University of Pittsburgh at Greensburg: Greensburg, PA)

Saturday, July 23
9:20 AM - 10:20 AM
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It’s Not Just Algebra—Assessing Student Thinking in Physics Problem-Solving

McCormick Place - W196c

Good problem-solving in physics is more than algebraic manipulation. Students can learn and you can assess problem-solving through multiple avenues, including graphs, representations, and more.

Takeaways: Attendees will learn how to assess student problem-solving ability and conceptual understanding through students' use of multiple representations and approaches in physics classrooms.

Speakers

Christopher Moore (University of Nebraska Omaha: Omaha, NE)

Saturday, July 23
10:40 AM - 11:40 AM
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Inclusivity through Evidence in High School Physics Courses

McCormick Place - W196c

What is it about how students engage with physics that perpetuates inequities in physics courses and in the field of physics more broadly? In this interactive workshop, participants will consider tents of inclusive physics instruction and contribute to a broader conversation about power structures and pedagogy that facilitate inclusivity. By analyzing videos of students working in a learning environment where they engage in science practices as a way of inducing physics principles (in alignment with the three dimensions of the Next Generation Science Standards), participants will consider how both the structure of the lessons and teacher moves can cultivate more equitable environments. We suggest that this learning environment disrupts traditional power structures that exist in classrooms, enhancing students’ voice both in authoring ideas and sanctioning ideas. Participants will consider what counts as success in a physics class and when and how people are recognized and rewarded. In the workshop, I’ll share discussion protocols and some of the student-facing physics lessons I’ve used that support this work.

Takeaways: How can student-collected evidence and consensus building serve to make high school physics courses equitable and inclusive?

Speakers

Shelly Belleau (University of Colorado Boulder: Boulder, CO)