970x250 - Exploration Generation (Girl+Rocket)
 

2022 Chicago National Conference - Sessions

Keyword

Strand








Topic


























Session Type











Grade Level



Pricing

Displaying 7 results

Thursday, July 21
8:20 AM - 9:20 AM
Add to My Agenda

Changing Climate and Food Production - How can we sequester carbon and feed our growing population?

McCormick Place - W176c

How can a change in human action impact carbon sequestration, biodiversity and soil health? In this hands-on investigation teachers will look for patterns in ecosystem diversity to determine cause and effect relationships for the services provided for by those ecosystems. We will capture mesofauna and calculate its species richness and relative abundance using Simpson’s Index of Diversity. Then, we will investigate soil structure to compare the species diversity to soil health. Is there a connection? How can improved soil health help to mitigate climate change? This investigation will spotlight how human impact has altered natural ecosystem services and discuss how this change has reduced carbon sequestration. How can we use symbiotic relationships and biogeochemical cycles to reverse this trend? Teachers will: - Investigate soil ecosystems - Calculate Simpson’s Index of Diversity - Determine cause and effect relationships between human impact and ecosystem services - Use foldscopes to identify organisms and collect data - Talk to industry experts in food production to connect science and technology to their classrooms. Free professional development and curriculum available from Nourishthefuture.org.

Takeaways: Investigate patterns in biodiversity, soil health, and carbon sequestration to determine human impact on ecosystem services and changing climate.

Speakers

Heather Bryan , Heather Bryan (Education Projects, LLC: Columbus, OH)

Thursday, July 21
9:40 AM - 10:40 AM
Add to My Agenda

Hands-on with Climate Science!

McCormick Place - W175c

Students may commonly hear the terms carbon dioxide, greenhouse gases, global warming, and climate change. It is important to understand climate science and climate change, and how energy use and consumer choices impact our environment, economics, and standard of living. Session participants will learn hands-on activities to use with their students to develop a better understanding of climate science. They will first explore NEED’s Greenhouse in a Beaker to observe how greenhouse gases, like CO2, act in our atmosphere through the use of common lab equipment. Can I Really Fry and Egg on the Sidewalk uses an infrared thermometer to showcase how radiant energy is absorbed by various surfaces at different rates and be able to see how different surfaces and the spaces surrounding them can have elevated temperatures, leading to a heat island effect. Road Trip involves calculating the carbon impact of transportation choices to learn about their carbon footprint.

Speakers

Cori Nelson (The NEED Project: Manassas, VA), Sharon Bird (Retired Teacher: Manassas, VA)

Thursday, July 21
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
Add to My Agenda

Cloudy with a Chance of Modeling

McCormick Place - W175a

Our students use field work, computer modeling, and long term databases to understand the Earth's changing system. Students collect local weather data. They compare this data with regional and national databases, satellites databases, and climate modeling software (EdGCM).

Takeaways: Teachers will learn how to introduce climate science in a non-threatening way by empowering their students to take a stand in their communities regarding decisions that affect their future by seamlessly incorporating field studies with professional climate studies.

Speakers

Tina Harris (Marion High School: Marion, IN), Carolyn Mohr (University Center of Lake County: Grayslake, IL)

Thursday, July 21
2:20 PM - 3:20 PM
Add to My Agenda

Let's Get Middle School Students Interested in Climate Change!

McCormick Place - W175a

What causes seasons on Earth? How is permafrost affected by climate change? What can we learn from ice cores about climate? These questions are answered through a series of NGSS aligned, hands-on activities. Students design an experiment to test the effect of Earth’s tilt on seasons, explore the effect of climate change on structures built on permafrost, and more! The eesmarts climate change curriculum is composed of adapted lessons surrounding natural cycles that occur on Earth and in our solar system, including the carbon cycle and sunspot activity, how these cycles affect populations, and how humans may affect natural cycles. Activities examine evidence from the past through proxies such as tree rings, cherry tree blossoms, and ice core data. Additional topics include climate and ecosystems, the impact of invasive species, and how to minimize the effect of human activity. The lessons are part of the eesmarts K-12 curriculum, an energy efficiency and clean, renewable energy learning initiative funded by the Connecticut Energy Efficiency Fund. They are written in the 5-E Instructional Model and include presentation Google Slides and handouts. Select digital resources will be provided to participants. The complete eesmarts program is free and available to all Connecticut educators.

Takeaways: Participants will explore activities involving natural cycles including the sun cycle, the carbon cycle, and seasons, as well as a variety of proxies and what they can tell us about Earth’s climate past and present.

Speakers

Kathleen Brooks (Capitol Region Education Council: Hartford, CT), Karin Jakubowski (University of New Haven: West Haven, CT)

Friday, July 22
11:50 AM - 12:50 PM
Add to My Agenda

Effectivenesss of Integration of Visual Representations Used in Middle School Biology Textbooks in Enhancing Sensemaking Among Students

McCormick Place - Exhibit Hall, Poster Session Area, Table 20

The goal of the study was to compare how visual representations were integrated into the content of middle school life science textbooks.

Takeaways: While most of the visual representations are completely linked and related to the content, there is still some room for improvement in making them more complementary than explanatory, which has added benefits.

Speakers

Mary Nyaema (University of Illinois Chicago: Chicago, IL)

Saturday, July 23
10:40 AM - 11:40 AM
Add to My Agenda

Understanding the Importance of Climate Modeling

McCormick Place - W195

A scientific model represents the cause and effect relationships between components of a system attempting to replicate the system in such a way as to be predictive. Models are necessary when the studied system is too complex to isolate each component and test variables and their impact on the whole system. Climate is a highly complex system, but modeling allows climate scientists to identify the variables within the system and study each of them independently and as a system. The evolution of video game graphics and consoles mirrors the evolution of models used to replicate Earth’s climate. To support the understanding of NGSS HS-ESS2: Earth’s Systems and HS-ESS3: Earth and Human Activity, session participants will analyze data from different factors affecting climate and average global temperatures. Ultimately, data shows the rapid increase of greenhouse gases due to human activity. Additionally, participants will examine various climate models focusing on the factors included in building the model and communicate their findings by creating their model. The National Center for Science Education supports science teachers through free professional development and curriculum to recognize and address science misconceptions using the three dimensions of the NGSS. Resources: https://ncse.ngo/supporting-teachers/classroom-resources

Takeaways: Scientists use models to understand highly complex systems and make predictions about future outcomes. Climate scientists use multiple data sources to design and test comprehensive climate models to examine past climates and predict future trends. Attendees will learn about the history and evolution of climate modeling while examining evidence that supports their reliability for predicting future climate patterns.

Speakers

Lin Andrews (National Center for Science Education: Oakland, CA), DeeDee Wright (Colorado State University: Fort Collins, CO), Cari Herndon (District of Columbia Public Schools: Washington, DC), Blake Touchet (National Center for Science Education: Oakland, CA)

Saturday, July 23
2:20 PM - 3:20 PM
Add to My Agenda

Energize Your Climate Change Course for High School

McCormick Place - W175c

How and why has Earth’s climate changed over time? How do we collect data about Earth’s natural history? How do Earth’s orbital variations affect climate? What role does phytoplankton play in the Carbon Cycle? These are all questions that are answered by exploring a series of hands-on activities that are NGSS aligned. Activities include: eccentricity, obliquity, precession, carbon and plants, the effect of carbon dioxide on temperature, ocean acidification, and more. The climate change curriculum, from the eesmarts K-12 curriculum, an energy efficiency and clean, renewable energy learning initiative funded by the Connecticut Energy Efficiency Fund, is made up of adapted lessons surrounding natural cycles that occur on Earth and how humans may affect natural cycles. Activities examine evidence from the past through proxies such as forams and ice core data. Additional topics include sea-level rise and vulnerability, the impact of single use plastics, and how the effect of human activity can be minimized. The lessons are written in the 5-E Instructional Model (Engage - Explore - Explain - Elaborate - Evaluate) and include teacher-presentation Google Slides and student handouts. Select digital resources will be provided to participants. The complete eesmarts program is free and available to all Connecticut educators.

Takeaways: Participants will explore activities that demonstrate how and why Earth’s climate has changed over time.

Speakers

Karin Jakubowski (University of New Haven: West Haven, CT), Kathleen Brooks (Capitol Region Education Council: Hartford, CT)