2022 Chicago National Conference - Sessions

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Thursday, July 21
9:40 AM - 10:40 AM
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Broaden Science Participation: Unpack “Analyze & Interpret” to Teach Data As an Equalizer

McCormick Place - W179b

We live in a data-driven world, and our students will be working in a data-driven workforce. Therefore, it is critical that our Pre-K-12 students learn foundational data literacy skills. However, currently these skills are too often only taught in upper-level classes. All students need these skills and all students, down to our little Pre-Kers, can work with and make sense of science data. Let’s make sure data is an equalizer, rather than another divider in our educational system and society! Join us as we explore what perception and learning science tell us about how our brains process data. We will experience research-based strategies and freely available resources to build science knowledge and self-efficacy through data. Finally, we will explore ways to adapt our existing curriculum activities and data visualizations to help our students more equitably access science. Through hands-on activities and group discussions, participants will leave more empowered to leverage data and data visualizations into their science content in purposeful ways for all learners. Working with and learning science from data fosters critical thinking skills, lifelong interests in science, and facilitates learners’ overall 21st century skills. Let’s set all of our students up for success!

Takeaways: Participants will identify how data literacy is a critical aspect of science literacy in the 21st century for all students and ways to adjust existing curriculum to leverage data as entry points into science inquiry, sensemaking, and knowledge for all learners to see themselves in STEM.

Speakers

Kristin Hunter-Thomson (Dataspire Education & Evaluation, Rutgers University: Princeton, NJ)

Thursday, July 21
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
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Stop “doing” data and start “using” data! Utilizing Google forms and sheets to collect and analyze data so you can focus on what comes next!

McCormick Place - W179a

So many data conversations fall flat because of current methods of data collection. What if we could vary the type and frequency we collect and analyze data using google forms and spreadsheets? This would allow us to have more in-depth conversations about what the data is say and how we can use it to move instruction forward. In this session, 5 different tools will be presented to teachers that allows them to collect data in different ways. With these tools, the focus is no longer on the past and why things happened, but focus on the future of what we can do to respond to the data.

Takeaways: Educators will learn about and receive templates for multiple tools using google forms and spreadsheets to realize the vision of a good data conversation

Speakers

Rocco Williams (Fort Worth ISD: Fort Worth, TX)

Thursday, July 21
2:20 PM - 3:20 PM
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Data, Tables, Graphs, Oh My! Strategies to Get All Students Doing & Speaking Science

McCormick Place - W176c

We are naturally curious, prone to ask why? How? What? Unfortunately, somewhere along the way students lose the trust in their voices to ask questions of and from data. But data are what we use to do science and it permeates all aspects of society today. What should we do? Stop teaching the vocabulary of science and data first, and instead leverage classroom-ready strategies to empower students to lead with their innate curiosity to practice critical 21st century data literacy skills and master the science content. Join us to explore connections between our science content, inquiry-based activities, and data skills. We will experience research-based strategies and freely available resources for integrating phenomenon-based and local data into our science instruction to promote science literacy and student empowerment. We will participate in activities ourselves and reflect on approaches for how to bring these into our classrooms. Participants will leave more empowered to integrate data into their science content in purposeful ways to better help students do and communicate science. Working with and learning science from data fosters critical thinking skills, lifelong interests in science, and facilitates learners’ overall self-identity as a scientist. Let’s set all of our students up for success!

Takeaways: Participants will identify how data literacy is a critical aspect of science literacy in the 21st century, how students can do a lot more with data than we often think or presume from their science vocabulary alone, and how to leverage existing strategies to authentically integrate data into 6-12 science instruction to teach their science content and increase literacy simultaneously.

Speakers

Kristin Hunter-Thomson (Dataspire Education & Evaluation, Rutgers University: Princeton, NJ)

Friday, July 22
8:00 AM - 9:00 AM
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Uncovering Student Misconceptions About Mathematical Models

McCormick Place - W193b

Students come into a science classroom with varying or little to no background knowledge. Mathematical modeling in the science classroom is a critical piece of any three-dimensional lesson. Come learn how one science teacher uses real-world student-collected data to make modeling fun and inclusive of all students!

Takeaways: Equity in the science/math classroom; data collection and analysis; and mathematical modeling.

Speakers

Stacy Thibodeaux (Southside High School: Youngsville, LA)

Saturday, July 23
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
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How to use NOAA data: A guide for educators

McCormick Place - W184a

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) collects hundreds of terabytes of data daily from satellites, buoys, weather stations, animal tags, and more. Though that may sound intimidating, much of this data is readily available to teachers and can be used in the classroom to teach about our natural world. Using scientific data in the classroom can be a great way for teachers to motivate students and for students to learn inquiry-based methods using real-world data. This presentation will highlight many of NOAA’s standards-supported resources, how to access them, and strategies for using them in the classroom. NOAA data spans Earth, life, and physical sciences, and comes in a variety of formats ranging from raw unprocessed real-time measurements and satellite images to processed visualizations, graphs, charts, and animations. Many resources are ready-to-go so you can bring data into your classroom tomorrow!

Takeaways: How to find and use NOAA data in your classroom.

Speakers

Bekkah Lampe (NOAA Office of Education: , United States), Shaun Evola (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration: Irvine, CA)