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Elementary Science

Taking a step into Agriculture

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Thelma Robles Thelma Robles 260 Points

hello 

Is teaching and having student's plant a bean, will be a good start in teaching them about agricultural?

Thank you.

Why not start with native plants that are food staples in your ocmmunity. Then select one or two that is easy to grow indoors. Perhaps beans, perhaps squash?  

Also include what is necessary for plant growth, what your students need to do to grow that plant, how it is used after harvesting, asking community growers into to work with the students, and plan for a garden in the spring and fall.

Here are a few resources:

https://www.agclassroom.org/teacher/matrix/lessonplan.cfm?lpid=8

http://www.iowaagliteracy.org/resources/lesson-plans/lesson-plans.aspx

http://www.agintheclassroom.org/TeacherResources/Lesson%20Booklets/100%20Days%20of%20School,%20100%20Agricultural%20Activities.pdf

You might also ask your HS agricultural teacher, if you have one. Futre Farmers of America may have lessons as well for your state/area.

Lindsay Connors Lindsay Connors 188 Points

Hi Ya'll! 

The farmer's Almanac is another great resourse. Growing up on a farm where the summers were hot and dry and the winters were wet and cold, we found that the almanac was a great resourse for planting times. Of course, Mother Nature can throw a wrench into things though.

 

Mary Bigelow Mary Bigelow 10265 Points

Hi Thelma -- You didn't mention what grade level you're teaching, but I suspect even older students may not realize where their food comes from. For example, beans are actually seeds, what we eat of the tomato or squash plant are botanically considered fruits, etc. My middle schoolers found it interesting to take a typical meal and trace what each dish was made of and where it could have come from as an introduction to agricultural studies. Beyond planting seeds, it's interesting for students to explore the variables that affect seed germination and plant growth -- Mary B

Mary Bigelow Mary Bigelow 10265 Points

Hi Thelma -- You didn't mention what grade level you're teaching, but I suspect even older students may not realize where their food comes from. For example, beans are actually seeds, what we eat of the tomato or squash plant are botanically considered fruits, etc. My middle schoolers found it interesting to take a typical meal and trace what each dish was made of and where it could have come from as an introduction to agricultural studies. Beyond planting seeds, it's interesting for students to explore the variables that affect seed germination and plant growth -- Mary B

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