970x250 - Exploration Generation (Girl+Rocket)

Energy Transfer Through Collisions

by: Victor Sampson and Ashley Murphy

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The guiding question of this investigation is, How does the energy of a moving ball change after it collides with objects that have different masses? In this lesson, the goal is to figure out how the energy of a moving billiard ball will change when it collides with objects of different masses. Students can create objects of different masses by hanging different numbers of washers from a string in the path of the billiard ball. The Teacher Notes provide connections to the standards, a timeline, safety notes, information on materials and preparation, and step-by-step instructions for facilitating the lesson and assessing student outcomes. After the Teacher Notes, you will find classroom-ready reproducible pages in the form of an Investigation Handout and Checkout Questions. Before you begin the lesson, we recommend reading Chapters 1 and 2, which are in this book selection. Chapter 1 provides an overview of Argument-Driven Inquiry (ADI) with an explanation of what happens during each of the eight stages of ADI, which are the same for every ADI investigation. Chapter 2 focuses on the investigations and how to use them, not to replace an existing science curriculum, but rather to function as a tool that teachers can use to integrate three-dimensional instruction into their existing curriculum. Also included in the book selection are the Table of Contents, Preface, Acknowledgments, About the Authors, Introduction, and Index.

Details

Type Book ChapterPub Date 5/30/2019Pages 114Stock # PB349X8_2

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