2022 Chicago National Conference

July 21-23, 2022

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FILTERS APPLIED:6 - 8, Presentation, Sensemaking

 

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26 results
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Lunch: Elements of Curriculum-Based Professional Learning

Wednesday, July 20 • 11:45 AM - 12:45 PM

Hyatt Regency McCormick Place - Regency Ballroom


STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

By Invitation Only

Shifting from traditional professional development to curriculum-based professional learning is a simple concept but complex to design and execute well. At its core, it means teachers experience the same kind of inquiry-based learning we expect them to provide their students. Learn more about a Carnegie Corporation of New York report, The Elements, which identifies a core set of research-based actions, approaches, and enabling conditions that effective schools and systems have put in place to reinforce and amplify the power of high-quality curriculum and skillful teaching.

TAKEAWAYS:
1. Examine beliefs and assumptions regarding the relationship between high-quality instructional materials, curriculum-based professional learning and student success 2. Gain understanding of the foundation for The Elements, a challenge paper from Carnegie Corporation of New York 3. Learn from science practitioners whose successful curriculum implementation efforts are grounded in the elements and essentials.

SPEAKERS:
Jim Short (Carnegie Corporation of New York: New York, NY)

Unpacking the Crosscutting Concepts with a Brand New NSTA Quick-Reference Guide to the Three Dimensions

Thursday, July 21 • 8:20 AM - 9:20 AM

McCormick Place - Skyline W375c


STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

Since its release, the NSTA Quick-Reference Guide to the NGSS has become an essential tool for many educators across the country. A new version titled the Quick-Reference Guide to the Three Dimension has been developed to not only support teachers in all states that have standards based on the Framework for K-12 Science Education. This new version of the Quick-Reference Guide still contains the most useful features of the original, including descriptions of the practices and the crosscutting concepts from the Framework of K-12 Science Education and K-12 progressions of the elements of all three dimensions. In addition, the new Quick-Reference Guide contains several new features that should make it even more helpful. For example, every element now has a unique code (based on the codes in the NSTA Atlas of the Three Dimensions) that makes it much easier to reference a particular element. In addition, there is an entire chapter devoted to the Performance Expectations. Finally, the guide also contains a number of tools for working with standards. This session will outline all of the features of the guide through the process of unpacking the crosscutting concepts to better understand how to make curriculum, instruction, and assessment more three-dimensional.

TAKEAWAYS:
A deeper understanding of the Crosscutting Concepts and how a well-designed reference guide can make it easier to unpack the three dimensions for work in curriculum, instruction, and assessment.

SPEAKERS:
Ted Willard (Discovery Education: Silver Spring, MD)

Using Online Investigations with Digitized Specimens to Enhance Data Literacy and Scientific Reasoning

Thursday, July 21 • 8:20 AM - 9:20 AM

McCormick Place - W181c



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
EPIC Bioscience - Data Interpretation Guide
Visual student guide to interpreting data patterns, with examples and non-examples.
EPIC Bioscience - Specimen Measurement Guide
A visual guide to measuring specimens, with examples and non-examples.

STRAND: Developing Scientific Literacy in the Science and STEM Classroom

Show Details

Online investigations with digitized specimens offer broad opportunities for teachers to engage their students in authentic scientific research. EPIC Bioscience investigations are free, online, NGSS-aligned research investigations that guide students to participate in science practices: asking a question, collecting data, analyzing and interpreting findings, and communicating to others. Investigations use specimens from natural history collections in entomology, vertebrate zoology, mycology, and botany to provide fully-supported, online investigations centered on real phenomena and aligned to NGSS MSLS2-1 through NGSS MSLS2-4. These investigations offer key opportunities to enhance scientific literacy through effective sensemaking with student-collected data on compelling specimens. This session focuses on two key goals to help teachers support sensemaking during phenomena-based student investigations: (1) Identifying and remediating common student errors and confusion during data collection and analysis. (2) Practicing effective instructional strategies focused on enhancing students’ scientific reasoning and data interpretation. This session will involve hands-on experiences with student activities, as well as interactive discussion of classroom examples and evidence.

TAKEAWAYS:
Identify common student errors and sources of confusion during data collection, analysis, and interpretation and deploy strategies designed to enhance student sensemaking from data.

SPEAKERS:
Kirsten Butcher (The University of Utah: Salt Lake City, UT), Madlyn Larson (Natural History Museum of Utah: Salt Lake City, UT)

Maximize the Benefits and Minimize the Challenges Associated with Embedding Engineering into the Science Curriculum using Argument-Driven Engineering

Thursday, July 21 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

McCormick Place - W178b


STRAND: Using Inquiry-Based STEM to Facilitate Learning for ALL

Show Details

This session is an introduction to a new approach to STEM instruction called Argument-Driven Engineering (ADE). ADE is an instructional approach that gives students an opportunity to learn to use core concepts and processes form science, engineering, and mathematics to figure out solutions to a meaningful and authentic problem that will help make the world a better place. This instructional approach also gives students an opportunity to develop disciplinary literacy skills (reading, writing, speaking, and listening) because they must obtain information, share and critique potential solutions through talk, and communicate what they figured out and how they know the solution is acceptable through writing. In this session, participants will examine the potential benefits and challenges associated with embedding engineering design into science classrooms and learn how the ADE instructional model can help maximize the benefits and reduce the challenges. Participants will also have a chance to experience an example of an ADE design challenge that invites them to design a shipping and storage container for insulin and see examples of how students who completed this design challenge used science, engineering, and mathematics content and processes to figure out how to keep the insulin cold for long periods of time. Participants will also learn about how this new approach was developed through three years of classroom-based research by a team of researchers at the University of Texas at Austin and how well ADE instructional materials are aligned with the TEKS for science, mathematics, CTE, and ELA.

TAKEAWAYS:
• How to give students an opportunity to learn how to use concepts and processes from science, engineering, and mathematics to design a solution to an authentic problem that will help make the world a better place.

SPEAKERS:
Todd Hutner (The University of Alabama: Austin, TX)

Instructional Materials that Support Equitable Science Instruction for All Students

Thursday, July 21 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - W185b-c


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking: Promoting Science and STEM Teaching Strategies That Place Equity at the Center of Learning

Show Details

In this session, participants will be introduced to a framework for identifying the features of a classroom culture that support equitable sensemaking. There are four main features: 1. Who is engaged in (or excluded from) classroom activity? 2. Who is treated as a "knower" in the classroom? 3. What ways of knowing are privileged in the classroom? 4. What science is practiced in the classroom? This framework is based off Kerri Wingert's Classroom Culture Investigations document and utilized as a foundational pieces of the OpenSciEd materials. Participants will unpack this framework and identify in sample pieces of student work and classroom videos examples of each one of these categories in action. They will be provided with tools and resources for self-assessing their own classroom culture including an exit ticket they can give to students to help inform the instruction. Examples of student work and instructional materials will be from the OpenScIEd instructional materials for middle school science.

TAKEAWAYS:
Classroom culture is critical to providing equitable sensemaking opportunities for all students.

SPEAKERS:
Sarah Delaney (OpenSciEd: San Carlos, CA)

Scaffolding Students’ Progression Through CCCs and SEPs Using Resources from the OpenSciEd Toolkit

Thursday, July 21 • 4:25 PM - 4:55 PM

McCormick Place - W186c



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
https://www.openscied.org/teacher-resources/
NSTA 2022 Chicago - SEP and CCC Toolkit Slides.pdf

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking: Promoting Science and STEM Teaching Strategies That Place Equity at the Center of Learning

Show Details

See how tools developed within OpenSciEd units can support students’ progression of and engagement in SEPs and CCCs across a variety of unit contexts.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will leave with practical tools such as graphic organizers, general rubrics, and self- and peer-assessments that can be used to support students in incrementally building SEPs and CCCs in a variety of units.

SPEAKERS:
Dawn Novak (Northwestern University: Evanston, IL), Gail Housman (Northwestern University: Evanston, IL), Jamie Noll (BSCS Science Learning: Colorado Springs, CO)

Surviving the Zombie Apocalypse: A 5E Instructional Unit on the Human Body

Thursday, July 21 • 4:25 PM - 4:55 PM

McCormick Place - W185d


STRAND: Using Inquiry-Based STEM to Facilitate Learning for ALL

Show Details

The provided instructional unit will elicit students’ prior knowledge, as well as foster their individual and collective understandings of the human body.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will be encouraged to utilize facet-based assessments and classroom argumentation throughout lessons framed with the 5E instructional model.

SPEAKERS:
Alicia Herrera, Ph.D. (Whitney Elementary School: No City, No State)

Formative Assessment and Developing Critical Thinking Skills

Thursday, July 21 • 4:25 PM - 4:55 PM

McCormick Place - W187c


STRAND: Using Inquiry-Based STEM to Facilitate Learning for ALL

Show Details

This session is intended to discuss the importance of formative assessment as a tool for guiding students and helping all students to make progress. A variety of formative assessment tools will be explored. Most importantly, the use of individual feedback on formative assessments will be demonstrated and we will discuss how this leads to improved metacognition and critical thinking skills for students. Attendees will see sample student work on formative assessments and accompanying sample teacher feedback. They will practice making comments of there own, in addition to discussing logistical concerns with the practice of individualized feedback.

TAKEAWAYS:
This session is intended to discuss the importance of formative assessment as a tool for guiding students and helping all students to make progress.

SPEAKERS:
Jennifer Maguire (Virginia Tech: Blacksburg, VA)

Building a Better ADI Understanding: Using Student-Created Avatars to Explain Past Scientist Experiences with ADI

Thursday, July 21 • 5:10 PM - 5:40 PM

McCormick Place - W176a


STRAND: Adapting Virtual Learning to Increase Access and Participation in a Face-to-Face Classroom

Show Details

This presentation reviews students researching and presenting on past ADI events in science through the creation of scientist avatars.

TAKEAWAYS:
1. This session highlights the use of a classroom-tested assignment where students are asked to create a personal avatar where they are pretending to be the actual scientist; and 2. The assignment works well to show actual ADI events that explain how science changes over time.

SPEAKERS:
William Sumrall (The University of Mississippi: University, MS)

Approaches to Assessment and Grading that Support Student Sensemaking

Friday, July 22 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

McCormick Place - Skyline W375a


STRAND: Promoting Effective Assessments in the Science and STEM Classroom

Show Details

As educators shift their teaching practice to align with the Framework for K-12 Science and the NGSS, they face various challenges and barriers. One pressing challenge is how to align their new approach to teaching and learning with existing assessment and grading systems. In this session, we will present provide examples of 3D assessments and associated scoring guidance. Participants will review student work for these sample assessments and identify evidence of understanding. They will collaborate with others in the session and determine how they would give grades based on set criteria. The second part of the session will highlight different approaches to grading based on local grading expectations (e.g., standards-based grading, daily grade requirements, or 100 point-based systems). Participants will leave the session with approaches to assessment and grading that support student sensemaking and honor the diverse resources students bring to the classroom.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will leave the session with approaches to assessment and grading that support student sensemaking and honor the diverse resources students bring to the classroom.

SPEAKERS:
Sarah Delaney (OpenSciEd: San Carlos, CA)

Promoting the 5th C-(Citizenship) of 21st Century Skills and CRE into an Inclusive STEAM Classroom

Friday, July 22 • 10:40 AM - 11:40 AM

McCormick Place - W176c


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking: Promoting Science and STEM Teaching Strategies That Place Equity at the Center of Learning

Show Details

The use of inclusive STEAM pedagogy is the forefront of using NRC Framework, Hill’s model, and 21st Century skill in unison for generating a sustainable STEAM curriculum. In this presentation, a demonstration of how to utilize these frameworks into creating project-based learning units that showcase diversity and the embodiment of students seeing diversity in the STEAM careers. The NRC framework will include SEPs for developing and using a model, planning and caring for an investigation, and using mathematical and computational thinking and CCCs of cause and effect, structure and function, and energy and matter. The use of the NRC framework with sensemaking (phenomena, science and engineering practices, student ideas, and science ideas) was the basis for developing a hurricane unit for 6th grade and macromolecule unit for 8th grade. Both of these units are grounded in these frameworks and the 5 C’s (communication, critical thinking, collaboration, creativity, citizenship) and the Hill’s model for cultural and historical education (CRE). All these frameworks are woven together on the Hill model lesson plan template to create hands-on PBL for the students. This presentation will give both STE(A)M and science teachers ideas on how to create a curriculum that incorporates more inclusivity and diversity while showcasing the work of my students.

TAKEAWAYS:
How to create a lesson that incorporates the 5 C's, CRE, SEPs, CCCs, and sense making into a lesson.

SPEAKERS:
Jenniffer Stetler (Chamblee Middle School: Chamblee, GA)

Formative Fundamentals - Designing meaningful assessment opportunities in an inclusive science curriculum

Friday, July 22 • 10:40 AM - 11:40 AM

McCormick Place - W181c


STRAND: Promoting Effective Assessments in the Science and STEM Classroom

Show Details

In this session, we will look at current research on the purpose and method of formative assessment. We will then pair the research with student work samples to examine different methods of providing meaningful and actionable feedback to encourage student growth. We will also reflect on our assessment practices through the lens of creating equitable classrooms to ensure that all of our students learn at their potential. This session’s formative assessment focus will also extend to designing science storylines with an emphasis on universal design for learning. We will highlight tools that all students can use in order to have access to content. We will examine opportunities for incorporating social-emotional learning in meaningful ways as we strive to encourage all students to think like scientists. We will culminate the session with a discussion on intentionally cultivating student agency. Join this interactive session to elevate how you are using formative assessment to drive student learning.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will leave with practical classroom strategies for elevating the importance of formative assessment and meaningful feedback to foster student inclusive science classrooms.

SPEAKERS:
Mike Jones (Illinois State University: Normal, IL)

Effective STEM Partnerships Enhance Student Learning

Friday, July 22 • 10:40 AM - 11:40 AM

McCormick Place - W193a


STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

In this workshop we will demonstrate for teachers how easy it is to form lasting, interactive partnerships with corporations, nonprofits, and local community organizations and discuss how these partnerships create a community of STEM learning that allows students to connect their learning with the real world. We will model a variety of direct connections between classroom science concepts and corporate processes and bring awareness to the power of establishing successful connections between organizational systems and careers. Field-based, first hand experiences in forming partnerships will be shared in an open discussion that helps educators identify the numerous benefits for both learners and partners that are brought by incorporating potential partners within the classroom. We will provide a systems-based approach for how to research potential partners, develop effective relationships, and reduce potential feelings of uncertainty on behalf of both the educator(s) and the non educator(s). Additionally, we will explore the power of perspectives as we highlight how non educators learn the value of their shared time, experience, and knowledge with students. We will look at tried and true, interactive presentations made by corporate, nonprofit, and community partners and discuss the importance of student feedback that is later provided to the partners.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will learn how to establish meaningful corporate and nonprofit partnership opportunities, the benefits of partnering, and the natural connections that exist between a variety of science concepts and corporate systems that promote student engagement and real world learning.

SPEAKERS:
Debby Nelson (Rotolo Middle School: Batavia, IL), Elizabeth Kaleta (John C. Dunham STEM Partnership School: Aurora, IL)

Supporting Learning Across All Three Dimensions Coherently from Unit to Unit Across Middle School

Friday, July 22 • 10:40 AM - 11:40 AM

McCormick Place - Skyline W375a



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Supporting Learning Across All Three Dimensions Coherently from Unit to Unit Ac

STRAND: Developing Scientific Literacy in the Science and STEM Classroom

Show Details

It has been common practice to move around units in science curricula based on teacher licensure, teacher preference, or state standards. However, the shifts in three-dimensional science learning supporting equitable science education emphasize the need for coherence intentionally helping students build the three dimensions, step by step, over time. We will describe a scope and sequence developed for the OpensciEd middle school program where each unit builds on the prior knowledge and experiences of all students to build increasing sophistication in all three dimensions, as they progress from unit to unit and grade to grade. We describe the strategies used to bundle performance expectations in a unit and for constructing progressions that build the elements of disciplinary core ideas, crosscutting concepts, and science and engineering practices (SEPs) coherently across the program. We describe how these instructional materials support teachers and students in connecting with and extending what students have figured out in prior units to build increasing sophistication with ideas and practices across the program.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will learn strategies for developing and adapting unit to unit connections that support students in building each of the three dimensions coherently over time.

SPEAKERS:
Brian Reiser (Learning Sciences, SESP, Northwestern University), Michael Novak (Northwestern University: Evanston, IL)

How can we support and assess student growth in the practice of arguing from evidence?

Friday, July 22 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

McCormick Place - Skyline W375a



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
NSTA 2022 - Supporting students in arguing from evidence.pdf

STRAND: Promoting Effective Assessments in the Science and STEM Classroom

Show Details

Arguing from evidence can be an integral part of the knowledge-building work students do as part of any three dimensional science learning, as students make sense of their findings and use them to develop and evaluate competing models and explanations. But how do we help students grow in sophistication in this practice over time? This presentation will provide an overview of the learning progression, tasks, and scaffolding used to help students refine and assess their arguments in the OpenSciEd middle school program, focus is on the support and growth embedded within a 7th grade chemistry unit. Participants will have opportunities to analyze curriculum supports, students’ written work, and video of discussions of students engaged in this practice using classroom artifacts from implementations of the OpenSciEd Bath Bomb unit.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will learn what the practice of arguing from evidence can look like in middle school classrooms, tools that can support scaffolding practice, and how teachers can use it to assess where students are at in their sense-making.

SPEAKERS:
Michael Novak (Northwestern University: Evanston, IL), Brian Reiser (Learning Sciences, SESP, Northwestern University)

Bringing 3D Learning Home and Back to School Again

Friday, July 22 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - W181a



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
3D Prompts_PPT_NSTA Chicago2022.pdf
Bringing 3D Learning Home(2).pdf

STRAND: Adapting Virtual Learning to Increase Access and Participation in a Face-to-Face Classroom

Show Details

Using CCCs can help organize and focus learning in a variety of settings. Out of necessity, we taught teachers to think deeply about connections to content and practices within the context of something they observed that was interesting to them while they were working from home. Examples learners chose that were relevant to them helped to connect personal experiences and interests with ordinary spaces and their science learning, and thus supported equitable engagement. Making these connections allowed teachers to recognize a multitude of science ideas and practices that could be connected to science standards at their instructional level, therefore developing new ideas. We refined this process and recognized that its flexibility can be taken back to the classroom and used settings that are seemingly science content deserts, to help students begin to see science in places they never thought of before. This session will take participants through this process and have them apply these ideas first to the setting of the conference and then to their own teaching situations.

TAKEAWAYS:
Leveraging CCCs to connect students’ observations of ordinary, relevant contexts provides more equitable opportunities to deeply engage with DCIs and SEPs.

SPEAKERS:
Ana Houseal (University of Wyoming: Laramie, WY), Clare Gunshenan (University of Wyoming: Laramie, WY)

Transforming Teaching Through Curriculum-Based Professional Learning

Friday, July 22 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - Skyline W375a


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking: Promoting Science and STEM Teaching Strategies That Place Equity at the Center of Learning

Show Details

Carnegie Corporation of New York released a challenge paper calling on the education field to transform teaching and learning through the elements and essentials of curriculum-based professional learning. Learn how schools and systems are helping teachers experience the instruction their students experience to help change instructional practices, leading to better student outcomes.

TAKEAWAYS:
1. Explore the rationale for a challenge paper dedicated solely to the issue of curriculum-based professional learning; 2. Discover the 10 elements and three essentials of professional learning critical to effective implementation of high-quality science instructional materials; and 3. Consider implications of the roles and responsibilities for putting into action the elements of curriculum-based professional learning.

SPEAKERS:
Jim Short (Carnegie Corporation of New York: New York, NY)

Using Three-dimensional Assessment Prompts to Drive Student Sense-making

Friday, July 22 • 3:40 PM - 4:40 PM

McCormick Place - W175c



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
3D Prompts_PPT_NSTA Chicago2022.pdf
Guide Writing Coherent 3-D Prompts

STRAND: Promoting Effective Assessments in the Science and STEM Classroom

Show Details

The Vision set forth by A Framework for K-12 Science Education and the Next Generation Science Standards emphasize science as the integration of practices (SEPs), content (DCIs), and big ideas (CCCs). By using all three dimensions, students are able to make sense of phenomena while learning science concepts and processes. However, this way of thinking and learning takes practice and guidance. Teachers play a pivotal role in helping their students to engage with this kind of science learning. Therefore, they must find ways to explicitly integrate and embed all three dimensions in activities, lessons, and assessments. This participatory presentation will explore how teachers can explicitly embed SEPs, DCIs, and CCCs into prompts (questions and guiding statements) to promote more integrated opportunities for student sense-making. By generating prompts that include SEPs, DCIs, and CCCs, teachers can guide students to think in a more three-dimensional way and gain the skills to do so outside of the classroom. Attendees will identify strategies for posing integrated prompts, consider the benefits of multi-dimensional prompts for students, practice asking and improving prompts, and apply these strategies to use in their own classroom context.

TAKEAWAYS:
Creating prompts (questions and guiding statements) that explicitly promote the three dimensions can drive more integrated, equitable student learning

SPEAKERS:
Ana Houseal (University of Wyoming: Laramie, WY), Clare Gunshenan (University of Wyoming: Laramie, WY)

Instructional Materials Design for Today's Science Standards

Saturday, July 23 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

McCormick Place - Skyline W375b



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Critical Features Webinar Slide Deck_NSTA Chicago 2022.pptx.pdf

Show Details

One of the most important factors for ensuring that all students experience science education that prepares them for future success is access to high-quality, standards-aligned instructional materials, especially critical for our nation’s Black, Latinx, multilingual, and low-income students. EdReports and NextGenScience provide evaluations of instructional materials to help identify these kinds of high-quality materials. The organizations co-developed the Critical Features of Instructional Materials Design resource to illustrate and provide unified definitions of features that ensure instructional materials can help students meet or exceed today’s science standards. The features described in this document are based on approaches to science learning and assessment described in A Framework for K–12 Science Education and subsequent research. This session leverages key features and illustrations to engage educators and developers in a conversation about the features and what they look like in materials.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will develop an understanding of the importance of high quality materials for supporting students and teachers and discuss how to utilize the critical curriculum features for improving development and selection of curriculum materials.

SPEAKERS:
Jenny Sarna (Director, NextGenScience), Shannon Wachowski (EdReports.org: Fort Collins, CO)

Creating a Science Classroom Podcast

Saturday, July 23 • 9:20 AM - 10:20 AM

McCormick Place - W187c



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Podcasting NSTA Session Resources

STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

Marshall Escamilla, one of the co-hosts of the freely-available Tumble Science Podcast for Kids, will share some of the basics of creating a podcast with your class. Classroom podcasts are a great way for students to share their learning with the broader community, and can be used both as assessment and communication tools--and it's a lot easier to do than you'd think. Beginning with a brief description of what features make Tumble free and accessible, Marshall will walk educators through all the thing they'll need to consider when creating a podcast. We'll start by asking questions like: -Who is the intended audience for this podcast? -What is the overall topic for it? -How many episodes do we want to create, and how often do we want to release them? Then we'll move on to some of the technical elements. What are the requirements for creating a podcast studio in your classroom? What equipment do you need to buy? What software do students need to have access to? how do you ensure that students can have access to what they need in order to be successful? Finally, we will discuss some of the basic skills teachers will need to ensure student success: knowledge of best audio recording practices, and how to use a few easily-accessible software tools to make students' work sound its best.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees at this ession will learn the very basics of how to create a classroom podcast from a professional podcaster.

SPEAKERS:
Marshall Escamilla (Tumble Media Production: Greenfield, MA)

Argument-Driven Inquiry as a way to bring three-dimensional instruction to your classroom

Saturday, July 23 • 9:20 AM - 10:20 AM

McCormick Place - W183c


STRAND: Strategies for Creating Inclusive Science and STEM Learning Environments

Show Details

The session will give teachers an opportunity to participate in the same sort of rich and meaningful learning experiences that are called for by the NGSS. Such learning places the focus squarely on the nature of instruction. It is rooted in ongoing, active experiences that will prompt teachers to expand their content knowledge, pedagogical knowledge, and expand their beliefs about what is possible inside the classroom. The presenter will guide the participants in a series of focused, small-group demonstration activities that are structured like a typical ADI investigation, allowing teachers to experience instruction as students do.

TAKEAWAYS:
• How to use this instructional model, or way of teaching, to give students an opportunity to learn how to use the DCIs, CCs, and SEPs to make sense of natural phenomena.

SPEAKERS:
Todd Hutner (The University of Alabama: Austin, TX)

Using Audio to Enhance Science Learning

Saturday, July 23 • 10:40 AM - 11:40 AM

McCormick Place - W187c



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Podcasting NSTA Session Resources

STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

In this panel discussion, we will discuss the ways that audio content like podcasts can be used in the classroom to increase student engagement. This discussion between several leaders in the field of audio education will share some of the ways that teachers can and should use audio content to enhance science learning at all grade levels.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will learn how to include audio in their lesson plans in ways that are effective, engaging, and inclusive.

SPEAKERS:
Marshall Escamilla (Tumble Media Production: Greenfield, MA)

Engaging All Students Using Culturally Relevant Inquiry Based Teaching Practices

Saturday, July 23 • 10:40 AM - 11:40 AM

McCormick Place - W181a


STRAND: Using Inquiry-Based STEM to Facilitate Learning for ALL

Show Details

Present culturally relevant inquiry-based teaching practices to engage all students in science learning. The interactive session will define what it means to be a culturally relevant practitioner, and how to use inquiry-based teaching practices in their science classroom. The participants will be engaged using scenarios and identification lessons that are culturally relevant inquiry-based.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will be able to define inquiry-based learning as culturally responsive/relevant teaching and identify characteristics of cultural competency in science teachers.

SPEAKERS:
Rochelle Darville (West St. John High School: Edgard, LA)

How to Make In-Person and Remote STEM Instruction Meaningful, Rigorous, and Equitable for Students

Saturday, July 23 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

McCormick Place - W179b


STRAND: Strategies for Creating Inclusive Science and STEM Learning Environments

Show Details

The session will give teachers an opportunity to participate in the same sort of rich and meaningful learning experiences that are called for by the NGSS. Such learning places the focus squarely on the nature of instruction. It is rooted in ongoing, active experiences that will prompt teachers to expand their content knowledge, pedagogical knowledge, and expand their beliefs about what is possible inside the classroom. The presenter will guide the participants in a series of focused, small-group demonstration activities that are structured like a typical day’s lesson, allowing teachers to experience instruction as students do. The session will give teachers an opportunity to participate in the same sort of rich and meaningful learning experiences that are called for by the NGSS. Such learning places the focus squarely on the nature of instruction. It is rooted in ongoing, active experiences that will prompt teachers to expand their content knowledge, pedagogical knowledge, and expand their beliefs about what is possible inside the classroom. The presenter will guide the participants in a series of focused, small-group demonstration activities that are structured like a typical day’s lesson, allowing teachers to experience instruction as students do.

TAKEAWAYS:
• How to make in-person and remote learnings experience more meaningful, relevant, and equitable for students.

SPEAKERS:
Todd Hutner (The University of Alabama: Austin, TX)

Lab Journals 2.0- Rethinking student-centered instructional practices

Saturday, July 23 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - W181a


STRAND: Using Inquiry-Based STEM to Facilitate Learning for ALL

Show Details

Expectations on deeper learning and more rigor in our curriculums have led to increased demands on our students. As we collectively shifted from paper to digital, our access to tools improved but has our instruction kept pace? How do we prevent our curriculum from becoming simply a digital pencil with disconnected simulations and activities that fail to embrace high-quality scientific practices? In this session, we will examine how digital science journals can be used as a means for evidence collection and reflection on student learning. Together, we will focus on how students collect and analyze evidence in a variety of meaningful ways. Examples of primary sources will showcase how students can observe and categorize similarities to help answer a driving question. We will also examine best practices around using simulations to drive student inquiry. An emphasis on exploring data, from organization to manipulation will also be highlighted. Finally, we will showcase how AR and VR can be effectively used in the classroom to allow students to think and act like real scientists along with open-sourced 3D prints. Join me for an engaging session!

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will be able to design educational opportunities focused on evidence collection and reflection to provide scientific arguments and explanations to a phenomenon.

SPEAKERS:
Mike Jones (Illinois State University: Normal, IL)

Starting with Complex Macroscopic Phenomena - A Different Approach to Teaching Cells & Genetics & Evolution

Saturday, July 23 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - Skyline W375b



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
NSTA 2022 Cells to Genetics.pdf

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking: Promoting Science and STEM Teaching Strategies That Place Equity at the Center of Learning

Show Details

Complex biological phenomena, such as how the body heals, how trait variations can be both inherited and influenced by the environment, and how organisms’ body structures can change over millions of years require explanations that connect components, interactions, and mechanisms working across multiple levels (at multiple scales). Traditionally, instructional materials have fragmented these complexities for students by starting instruction with the smallest components of the system or the simplest mechanism first (cells, genotypes, mitosis, or natural selection). In this session, we will show a different approach in which students explore the most directly observable levels and most complex aspects of these phenomena first in service of creating more authentic and accessible opportunities to leverage students’ own experiences and questions. These experiences and questions then lead to developing complex science ideas over time. Participants will explore the anchoring phenomena from three OpenSciEd middle school life science units to see how students’ prior experiences and ideas can be used to generate thoughtful questions about the mechanisms involved that will lead students to uncovering the smaller components, interactions, and mechanisms in the related systems through subsequent investigations.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will explore examples of three life science units that use accessible entry points to support students in making sense of complex biological phenomena.

SPEAKERS:
Gail Housman (Northwestern University: Evanston, IL), Michael Novak (Northwestern University: Evanston, IL), Jamie Noll (BSCS Science Learning: Colorado Springs, CO), Dawn Novak (Northwestern University: Evanston, IL)

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