2023 Kansas City National Conference

October 25-28, 2023

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Rooms and times subject to change.
16 results
Save up to 50 sessions in your agenda.

Brave Enough to Fail: Three Strategies for Building Student Resilience Around Data Analysis

Thursday, October 26 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 1501 B


STRAND: Research to Practice

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Sponsoring Company: Stile Education

Join our session to learn strategies for teaching data analysis and modeling in line with the NGSS. Empower your students to analyze real-world data, create accurate models, and apply their knowledge with easy-to-implement techniques. Participate in and win CHARTY PARTY while enhancing your toolkit!

SPEAKERS:
Hailey Vogel (Head of Teaching and Learning: Los Angeles, CA)

Build a STEM Slide Whistle

Thursday, October 26 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Mary Lou Williams


STRAND: STEM Haven

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Participants will build their own digital slid whistle. They will experiment with a motion sensor and use that data to convert to sound frequency by creating a regression equation. This activity is a simple one to two day activity that can be completed in the classroom as an enrichment or as a stand alone activity that can be developed over several class sessions.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will leave with a simple STEM project that will engage students and can lead to incredible enrichment discussions!

SPEAKERS:
Brad Posnanski (Comsewogue High School: Port Jefferson Station, NY)

The "Foot-to-Hand" Research Project: Is There a Correlation Between Hand and Foot Length?

Friday, October 27 • 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - Exhibit Hall, Poster Session Aisle



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Poster NSTA Foot-to-hand Handout.pdf

STRAND: STEM Haven

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Is there a correlation between the length of someone’s hand and shoe size? While this may seem like a silly question, we've developed a full research project called the "Foot-to-Hand Ratio." This research project uniquely exposes students to units of measurement, dimensional analysis, and research. Over a period of years, a class of 24 students completed this research project. Students measured the length of one hand, one foot, and their height. Then they calculated their Foot-to-Hand, Height-to-Foot, and Height-to-Hand ratios. Surprisingly, there was a direct correlation between the hand and foot length, and height and hand, or foot, length. In addition, students used statistics to dismiss "outliers" in the data.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will have access to a new, simple research project that incorporates mathematics.

SPEAKERS:
Sharron Jenkins (Georgia Gwinnett College: Lawrenceville, GA)

Using Pan and Digital Balances to Describe and Compare Weight

Friday, October 27 • 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - Exhibit Hall, Poster Session Aisle



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Different Instruments for Quantifying Qualifying Weight
Weight measurement with pan and digital balances.

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

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The poster aims to present student ideas about mathematics and computational thinking (MCT) in the context of weight (elementary) or mass (secondary). Standards K-PS2-1 and 3-PS2-1 emphasize and guide the three-dimensional approach. Participants consider the differences and similarities between a pan and digital balance with a Venn diagram. Students typically think of weight as a quantitative measure. The pan balance can be used to describe the weight of an object both qualitatively and quantitatively. In mathematics education, pan balances quantify the weight of objects with a set of known weights. Weighted plastic of one, five, or ten increments placed on one side of the pan quantitatively measures the ”weight” of the object on the other pan. Educators use “weight” to describe “mass” and refer to heaviness or the amount of stuff an object has at the elementary level. Comparing and contrasting quantities and relationships align with the SEP of using MCT.

TAKEAWAYS:
After comparing the weight of two or more objects with a pan and digital balance, a Venn diagram structures students' thinking about the weight measurement tools. We present students’ ideas about balances and offer strategies to uncover students’ ideas about qualitative and quantitative measurements.

SPEAKERS:
Jaclyn Murray (Mercer University: Macon, GA)

Building student excitement in the classroom: How the engineering design process increases student excitement for science and math

Friday, October 27 • 1:20 PM - 2:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2102 A


STRAND: STEM Haven

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STEM learning activities have been shown to increase student engagement (Fredricks et al., 2003) and learning (English, 2016). Because we are currently experiencing huge growth in STEM fields, we need to grow student interest in future STEM careers. STEM careers, which combine aspects of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics, are growing exponentially (American Association for the Advancement of Science, 2021; Ramaley et al., 2005; Scott-Parker & Barone-Nuget, 2019). To be globally competitive in a technologically diverse society, educators and policymakers aim to build scientific and mathematically literate students who are prepared for integrated STEM career fields. Employers not only need future employees to be literate in math and science, but they also need students to develop creativity and critical thinking skills; these are skills that cannot be replaced with computer or robotic technology. Development of student interest in STEM is critical for future generations.

TAKEAWAYS:
Teachers and administrators will see how the incorporation of STEM activities can be used to increase student engagement and excitement in the classroom. Lesson plans and connections to science and math standards are included.

SPEAKERS:
Leslie Sauder (Northern State University: No City, No State)

The Chemistry and Statistics of the U.S. Penny

Friday, October 27 • 1:20 PM - 2:20 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Big Joe Turner B


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

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How can we assess the quality of sampling and variability of the data to help us in decision-making? The various metals and alloys used in the minting of the penny over the years will provide for rich explorations, which are part of the chemistry curriculum. We will highlight the important cross-disciplinary aspect, linking the science content (mass/chemical composition) to the mathematical models outlined in the NGSS section on Systems and Models to show how to use it to simulate systems and interactions. Through hands-on activities and the use of technology, participants will explore a variety of data sets and use this knowledge to better understand and use statistics to make accurate and fair arguments related to everyday topics. We will explore how the sample mean varies from sample to sample. While this is considered one of the more challenging topics for quality control, we will illustrate the concepts though some basic sampling of the typical age and mass of the U.S. penny.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will use real data to develop mathematical models and learn how to test our hypothesis by performing an experiment and analyzing the results, combining chemical analysis with statistical sampling for a cross-curricular approach.

SPEAKERS:
Karlheinz Haas (Science/Math Instructor, Retired: Tequesta, FL)

Build a STEM Slide Whistle

Friday, October 27 • 1:20 PM - 2:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2503 B


STRAND: STEM Haven

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Sponsoring Company: Texas Instruments

Combine science, math, paper towel tubes, popsicle sticks, cardstock, and a calculator into an actual working slide whistle. This project explores the frequencies of musical notes and uses a linear equation (y=mx+b) to create a functional, customizable slide whistle.

Meeting the Challenges of Math & Computation with OpenSciEd HS

Saturday, October 28 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 H



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
NSTA Kansas City Presentation Math Progression Doc.pdf
Supporting mathematics progressions in OpenSciEd HS - NSTA 2023 Kansas City.pdf

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

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The HS-level NGSS practices of Analyzing Data (SEP 4) and Using Mathematical and Computational thinking (SEP 5) present a quandary: most HS-level curricula separate math into a rote set of instructional materials like the “stoichiometry unit” or the “forces calculations.” We illustrate a different approach, using OpenSciEd Biology, Chemistry, and Physics units to show how to meet the 3D vision of NGSS and not artificially separating content from mathematical modeling or calculations. By leveraging mathematical thinking contextually and just-in-time, students engage with these practices as sensemaking tools, deepening student understanding of the science and fluency in employing math in novel ways. We explore how complex engagement with these practices is supported in high school courses and discuss how to meet the demands of mathematical thinking in various contexts.

TAKEAWAYS:
Leveraging data analysis and mathematical thinking in the context of meaningful phenomena and problems like food sovereignty, rather than frontloading rote math “skills,” helps students engage with these practices as sensemaking tools, deepening student understanding of both science and math.

SPEAKERS:
Wayne Wright (NSTA: Arlington, VA), Nicole Vick (Northwestern University), Michael Novak (Northwestern University: Evanston, IL)

The Vitamin C Workshop: Quantitative Analysis of Vitamin C in Juice and Vitamins - The Perfect Integration of Chemistry and Mathematics

Saturday, October 28 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2201



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
0-Workshop NSTA VitC Titration Handout GraphPaper.pdf
0-Workshop NSTA VitC Titration Handout Instructions.pdf
1-NSTA Vit C Titration Handout.pdf
2-NSTA Vit C Clock Handout.pdf
3-NSTA Red Cabbage Handout.pdf
4-NSTA Foot to Hand.pdf
5-NSTA Milk Lab Handout.pdf
NSTA Pic.jpg

STRAND: STEM Haven

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Adventures in Laboratory Science is a theme-based physical science course for non-science majors designed to expose students to the basic principles of chemistry and mathematics using common household substances. In addition to "non-science" college students, this workshop is appropriate for teachers of students in the 3rd through 12th grades. Attendees will work in groups of 4 to complete two experiments: the titration of vitamin C with iodine and the iodine clock reaction. The experiments will include the titration of standard vitamin C solutions to produce a linear curve which will be used to calculate the vitamin C content in juice samples. After collecting all data, participants will analyze and interpret the results using Excel and basic algebraic principles. The goal is to have participants do the Vitamin C project with their students and then enter the data into a shared file to create a national collaborative publishable work between the presenter and the attendees.

TAKEAWAYS:
Learn how to integrate math into the vitamin C project and customize the project to meet the academic standards of your students and to join a collaborative research project for students in 3rd through 12th grade.

SPEAKERS:
Sharron Jenkins (Georgia Gwinnett College: Lawrenceville, GA)

STEM Strategies for Developing Critical Thinking, Creativity, Communication, Collaboration, and Resilience

Saturday, October 28 • 9:20 AM - 10:20 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2103 C



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Presentation
Slide deck

STRAND: STEM Haven

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This presentation explores transdisciplinary STEM strategies that foster critical thinking, creativity, communication, collaboration, and resilience in students. The session will focus on providing learning opportunities that prioritize contexts of societal relevance and student/community interests, while highlighting the importance of having the skills and knowledge necessary to solve real-world problems. Participants will learn about phenomenon-based learning, unit planning with NGSS, inquiry-based lesson planning, and other strategies that promote student-centered learning. The presentation will also showcase strategies for integrating science, technology, engineering, and mathematics into the learning experience, emphasizing the importance of inclusive practices that recognize and value diverse perspectives. Through this session, participants will gain insights into how to create more inclusive and equitable learning environments in STEM education.

TAKEAWAYS:
This workshop focuses on equipping students with skills to solve real-world problems in STEM fields through relevant learning opportunities, effective tools and strategies, and the integration of 21st century skills.

SPEAKERS:
Kara Ball (Academic Officer: , MD)

In-Class or Home School Integrated Math & Science Chemistry Research Projects

Saturday, October 28 • 11:30 AM - 1:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - Exhibit Hall, Share-a-thon Area



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
0-Workshop NSTA VitC Titration Handout GraphPaper.pdf
Workshop Vitamin C Lab - Graph Paper
0-Workshop NSTA VitC Titration Handout Instructions.pdf
1-NSTA Vit C Titration Handout.pdf
2-NSTA Vit C Clock Handout.pdf
Vitamin C Lab
3-NSTA Red Cabbage Handout.pdf
4-NSTA Foot to Hand.pdf
5-NSTA Milk Lab Handout.pdf

Show Details

This presentation revolves around the development of two distinctive research projects: Vitamin C Project and the Carbon Dioxide Project. In the Vitamin C project, participants extract juice from fruits and determine the vitamin C content using common household chemicals. In the Carbon Dioxide Project, participants quantitatively determine the amount of carbon dioxide and water produced when mixing specified amounts of baking soda and vinegar. The capture of carbon dioxide and water in clear balloons is an engaging way to apply basic mathematics to a chemical reaction. Embracing an integrative approach to teaching science and mathematics helps bridge the gap between knowledge learned and knowledge applied. This presentation will provide educators with innovative, standards-aligned projects that foster student interest in science and mathematics. For 3rd - 6th graders, these research projects can be delivered through storybooks!

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will gain full activity descriptions and handouts for at least three projects and learn how to integrate math skills into research projects that promote critical thinking and discovery (targeting 3rd - 12th grade).

SPEAKERS:
Sharron Jenkins (Georgia Gwinnett College: Lawrenceville, GA)

Using a computational model to learn population-level viral transmission through the lens of probability

Saturday, October 28 • 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - Exhibit Hall, Poster Session Aisle


STRAND: STEM Haven

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This lesson is part of a multi-day unit designed for middle school students to learn about viral respiratory pandemics. The lesson incorporates a free computation model called Disease Spread, which is provided by Gizmos. The lesson is divided into two 45-minute blocks. In the first block, students are introduced to the concept of probability, explore the relationship between probability of transmission and the time it takes for a virus to spread through a group of people. Students generate hypotheses, brainstorm methods to test their hypotheses, and get familiar with the simulation. During the second block, students first collect data using the computational model. They then analyze data using means and histograms with both digital tools and unplugged activities. Students draw conclusions based on their findings, and discuss the affordances and limitations of the computational model.

TAKEAWAYS:
We demonstrate how to utilize a computational model and integrate mathematics concepts (i.e., probability) to help students engage in and make sense of a science phenomenon with critical connections to society (i.e.,the spread of viruses).

SPEAKERS:
Swarna Mahapatra (Graduate Student: Columbia, MO)

Cereal Box Dominoes in the K-4 Science Classroom

Saturday, October 28 • 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - Exhibit Hall, Poster Session Aisle


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We believe lifelong learners are developed as a result of a strong early childhood foundation in problem-solving and sensemaking. This session documents a lesson in engendering, math, and problem-solving we developed with cereal box dominoes in our K-4 science class. The lesson included and engaged all students in saving, sorting, and creating a domino path pattern, as well as the community and surrounding city as churches, parents, apartment complexes, friends, and family saved boxes and eagerly anticipated the domino event.

TAKEAWAYS:
Session demonstrates how science is presented to K-4 students to both build a strong science foundation and competency in problem solving.

SPEAKERS:
Susan (Cee Cee) Cohen (Retired Teacher: Madison, WI)

Enhancing Science Notebooks with Scientific Sketching and Nature Journaling

Saturday, October 28 • 1:20 PM - 2:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2214



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Enhancing Science Notebooks with Nature Journaling

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

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Attendees will learn techniques and strategies for incorporating scientific sketching and nature journaling into students’ science notebook routines by engaging in the activities themselves. Materials and natural physical specimens will be provided for journaling and sketching activities. Student examples and free resources will be shared. This workshop is appropriate for all K-12 teachers and informal science educators.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will be introduced to, and participate in, several nature journaling activities from the free John Muir Laws "How to Teach Nature Journaling" book, as well as receive some scientific sketching guidance from the California Academy of Sciences. Special attention to integrating math will be included.

SPEAKERS:
Dana Atwood-Blaine (University of Northern Iowa: Cedar Falls, IA)

Connecting Math and Science Through Technology: Data Analysis Made Easy

Saturday, October 28 • 1:20 PM - 2:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2504 B


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

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The workshop will offer ideas to move from the typical teacher-led classroom to one that focuses on problem-solving, data analysis and exploratory learning. Learn how to combine graphing calculators with handheld sensors to maximize class time and provide opportunities for engaging inquiry and discussion. We will illustrate how you can utilize science tasks to support your 3-D initiative and the goals outlined in the NGSS, while at the same time reinforcing and seamlessly integrating CCSS for Mathematics. You can use one sensor at a time or multiple sensors simultaneously for lab-based or in-the-field data collection to quickly collect and analyze data. Several sensors will be available to explore this integrated solution. Hands-on science using this integrated technology gets students excited about science and math and deepens their understanding of seemingly complex concepts. It will free up class time for student engagement in the analysis, synthesis, and evaluation of real data.

TAKEAWAYS:
Use real data to develop mathematical models and learn how to test your hypothesis by performing an experiment and analyzing your results, combining graphing calculators with handheld sensors to maximize class time.

SPEAKERS:
Karlheinz Haas (Science/Math Instructor, Retired: Tequesta, FL)

The Color and Sound of Temperature

Saturday, October 28 • 1:20 PM - 2:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2503 A


STRAND: STEM Haven

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Participants in this workshop will use a temperature sensor/probe to measure the temperature of a liquid. They will then design and code a program that will display the temperature and also incorporate other multi-sensory devices to indicate if the liquid is safe for drinking. This workshop will allow participants to go through the engineering design process and create a working model by the end of the session. No prior coding knowledge is required, just a willingness to create, learn, and have fun doing it.

TAKEAWAYS:
Create a multi-sensory temperature detector. Implement coding in Python into the STEM/Science/Mathematics classroom. Learn how to give students ownership in their projects.

SPEAKERS:
Jessica Kohout (Educational Consultant: Voorhees, NJ), Brad Posnanski (Comsewogue High School: Port Jefferson Station, NY)

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